To:

Regarding:

From:      Lance Lee Lawson

3504 Chancellor Ave, Modesto, CA 95350

MESS: 209 544 0518

Date:

125 work examples in Computer Information Systems, Operations Management, and Engineering.

.only link here back to homepage  !!

Web site:  www.Lawsoncomputing.com…this data is presented there also

 Technician

 Technician

State Licensed Vocational Instructor:

# 109295650981:

Microcomputer Applications.

Computer Technology.

Network Technical Support.

Job Development-Placement.

Internet Technician

CSUS BS Business Administration: Computer Information Systems

and Operations Management concentrations.

AS Engineering, Modesto Junior College, AutoCAD, DesignCAD

MBA Operations and Marketing completed

Restaurant-hotel, retail, Red Cross and executive training experiences

Millwright Local 102, Oakland CA …. Sheet Metal Local 162, Central CA.
Industrial – Mechanical fabrication – Millwright and Industrial Journeyman

 

Certified Personal Trainer

Table of contents, categories below.

Table of contents, next several pages.

These examples were mostly completed at the end of my graduation at CSUS. I scanned most of my work in and several of the files came out in less than ideal resolution.

Text coverage is from hand notes and topics covered.

Completed college coursework

Page 155

RESUME 2002….need to update……….<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<

Page 156

Professional development during 1997 to 2002..and  2003 addendum

Page 157-159

My MBA work

Page 160-161

Student comments from instruction 1998 - 2003

Page 162-163

Company Brochure from 1993

Page 164

 

 

I have used my life experiences on many of these exercises.

Operations Management

Computer Information Systems

Engineering

Variety (All)

 

Pages 10-37

Production

 

Pages 31, 39-54

Variety (All)

 

Pages 10-37

Database Design.

Pages 24,

Coursework completed

Pages 155

Productivity

 

Pages 55-66

Quality

 

Pages 23, 67-71

Finance

Pgs

18-20, 112-116

Enterprise Info. Sys

Pgs 108-111

Mechanical / AutoCad accessories. Sourcing.

Pages 131

Project Mgmt.

Pages 16, 72-74

Job Shop

Pages 75-80

Info. Sys. Mgmt.

Pages 117-126

Expert Sys.

Pages 87-91

Industrial Engineering

Pages 55-66, see DSS

Decision Support

 

Pages 22, 87-111

Materials

 

Pages 39-54, see DSS

Marketing

 

Pages 25, 127-146

Management

Pages

147-150

Industrial Supplies

Sourcing on Internet.

Pages 132,133

Applied spreadsheets

Pages throughout

Linear Programming Examples

Pages 93-111

Operating Systems

Pages 10-13

System analysis

Pages 81

CMMS terms

 

Pages 134-135

Job Searching

 

 

Pages 139-140

Business Plan

 

 

Pages 14, 147-150

3 month computer training layout.

condensed.

Pages 138

My Software, experience

Pages 152

Vocational School Operational planning and priority planning.

Pages 136-137

Table of contents, variety, catagories TOC next 6 pages.

Software Application

Software used.

The Business Plan

Lotus SmartSuite 96

Page 14

Flow Charting, job placement, supplement

Microsoft PowerPoint 95

Page 15

Project Management

Microsoft Project

Page 16

Object Linking and Embedding example

Microsoft Office 95

Page 17

Finance

Visual Basic Pro 95

Page 18

Finance, minimize cost

Excel 95

Page 19

Finance, what ifs

Excel 95 with Solver.

Page 20

Finance, data analysis

w/ pivot tables Excel 95

Page 20

Risk Simulation

Lotus 123, 96

Page 21

Decision Support Systems

Visual Basic Pro 95, DSS, LP

Page 22

Quality Control, fishbone, other

Lotus Freelance Graphics

Page 23

Database Development, E-R, Relationships

Microsoft Access 95

Page 24

Database, Research, Mkt apps

PhoneDisc ......Access95 .......Excel 95.

Page 25, 26, 27

System Analysis

Win Advisor & Check-it Pro 3.0

Page 29

Engineering

AUTOCAD r.12, DesignCad 5.0

Page 30

Production-Operations

Visual Basic Pro 95, Win NT. others

Page 31

Production-Operations

Excel, 18 applications on one screen

Page 32

Manufacturing

Several Packages  

Page 33, 34

Office Pro 95

Office Bindery

Page 35

Computer Industry Update

Reseller News, periodicals

Page 36

Visual Basic 4.0 Presentation

PowerPoint 95 ..to big

Page

Tax assessment report __COBOL- Text

COBOL

Page 37

Operating-System Interfaces.

Windows 3.1 and Operations Management

Page 10

Win NT 3.51 and Operations Management

Page 10

Lotus SmartSuite  w/ Win95

Page 11

Win 95-98 w/Office Pro 97-2000

Page 12

Windows 2000 and Office XP

Page 13

Reports and Software used.
Production and Operations Management.

Materials, Processes & Inventory Control , Summary (22pgs)

summary

Page 39

Short summary & calculations

summary

Page 40, 41

Production planning, level production.

Lotus

Page 42

Prod. Planning, unleveled + max profit.

Lotus / DSS

Page 43

Aggregate Plan / Production strategies.

Lotus

Page 44, 45

Material Requirements Planning.

Lotus

Page 46

Capacity Management.

Lotus

Page 47

Capacity Planning

Lotus

Page 48

Master Production Scheduling.

Lotus

Page 49, 50, 51

The Planning Process.

MS Publisher

Page 52

Forecasting Production

Lotus

Page 53

Capital Management and Inventories, a mix

Lotus

Page 54

Productivity Management.

Notes, text, Process improvement

Industrial Engineering

Page 55

Summary text

Industrial Engineering

Page 56, 57

Short Summary , text

Industrial Engineering

Page 58, 59

Case 1-operator analysis

Industrial Engineering

Page 60

Case 2-Process analysis

Industrial Engineering

Page 61

Case 3 – Process analysis, clerical

Industrial Engineering

Page 62

Analysis, Load Distance

Ind engr.  Lotus-Excel

Page 63

Process Analysis, Process

Ind engr  Lotus-Excel

Page 64

Operator Analysis

Ind engr  Lotus-Excel

Page 65

Clerical Analysis

MS PowerPoint

Page 66

Quality Control and Management.

Summary

summary

Page 67

Control Chart, number of defects

Lotus

Page 68

Control Chart, out of control

Lotus

Page 68

X / R Chart

Lotus

Page 69

Control Cart, proportion of defectives

Lotus

Page 69

Zone Control Chart

Lotus

Page 70

U- Chart

Lotus

Page 70

Downtime, Rejections

Lotus

Page 71

Project Management.

Project Management with Pert

Linear programming models

Page 72

Project Crashing,  DSS                 

Linear programming models

Page 73, 74

 

 

 

Job Shop Examples, spreadsheets.

Job Status

Lotus - Excel

Page 75

Team Building

Lotus - Excel

Page 76

Equipment Service Recording

Lotus - Excel

Page 77

Shop Consumables

Lotus - Excel

Page 78

Job Estimate and Material Usage

Lotus - Excel

Page 79

Project Management

Lotus - Excel

Page 80

COMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMS

System Analysis & Design ___summary

Text

Page 81

Learning Objectives for Database Mgmt systems

Text

Page 82

Entity Relationship diagram, data tables

MS PowerPoint

Page 83

SQL terms

 

Page 84

Database Reports, screenshot

options / printouts. MS Access

Page 84

SQL Programming example

Access,  UNIX, HP 9000  

Page 85, 86

Structured Programming / Expert Systems.

Finding new Quota

Expert system

Page 87, 88

Investing

Expert system

Page 89, 90

Mfg. Batch selection

Programming_ Expert systems

Page 91

Management Science / Decision Support / Expert Systems

Decision Support Notes here

DSS

Page 92

Linear Programming Examples here and below.

Program code printout

Page 93

Management Science Notes click here

Optimization

Page 94, 95, 96, 97

Minimize Mfg. cost / Team building

Assignment programming

Page 98

New Factory Location optimization

Transportation model

Page 99

Machine / Employee Selection, optimization

Assignment programming

Page 100

Shipping Cost optimization

Integer programming

Page 101

Scheduling Analysis, 3 examples

Queuing theory ( retail , services )

Page 102

Waiting Lines & Service crews

( truck unloading , service crews )

Page 103

MFG. Multiple goals _ Mfg. & Mkt

Goal Programming

Page 104

Model Formulation

"Programming of model"

Page 105

Inventory Management

Linear Programming

Page 106

Production Schedule

Linear programming

Page 107

More Linear programming applications

include later?

Page

Executive / Enterprise Information Systems

Business growth analysis

Excel , MS EIS pack , ~ Visual Basic

Page 108

Break-even analysis

Excel , MS EIS pack , ~ Visual Basic

Page 109

Scheduling  & Product mix

Linear Programming

Page 110

Budget, school. . this one is cool

DSS / Visual Basic / Excel

Page 111

Finance Spreadsheets

Unequal Lives, Purchasing Analysis

Lotus / Excel

Page 112

Break Even and Operating Leverage

Lotus / Excel

Page 113

Certainty Equivalents

Lotus / Excel

Page 114

Time Disparity Ranking

Lotus / Excel

Page 115

Cost Analysis of Plant Locations

Lotus / Excel

Page 116

Capital Rationing

Lotus / Excel

Page not inc.

__Information Systems Management. ___Short case Studies

Info Infrastructure All /text

Corp. Analysis

Page 117, 118

Managing IS

Strategic uses of information

Page 119, 120

Application Development

Analysis

Page 121

Intranet

Application

Page 122

Manage Change

Campus bookstore

Page 123

Project Mgmt.

A corporate view

Page 124

Information System Planning

The new and why of IS.

Page 125

Information System Planning Over -View  

Blueprint for analysis

Page 126

Marketing

Marketing Plan, Outline, terms, also see MBA

Blueprint

Page 127, 128

MBA Marketing Plan,

Blueprint

Page 141-143

Marketing Plan, Outline, terms II

 

Page 144 – 145

Web Based Marketing, really condensed

 

Page 146

Engineering

Engineering  Lingo FEA

 

Page 129, 130

Internet Sourcing, Mechanical applications

AutoCAD here

Page 131

Internet Sourcing, Industrial applications

Industrial

Page 132, 133

Computer Maintenance Mgmt System

CMMS

Page 134, 135

Vocational School Administration

Operational Planning and prioritizing

Marketing, placement, maintenance, training….

Page 136, 137

Computer course training, hr by hr.

condensed

Page 138

 

Blank

Page 

Job searching, worldwide

websites

Page 139-140

 

 

 

Management

Business Policy ~ 50 pgs, Course overview, cut..

 

Page 147, 148

Strategic Management notes

Integration Strategies

Page 149, 150

 

Resources Applied: Software-Hardware-Periodicals

Software application

1984-92.

Page 151

Software applications

1993-97

Page 152

Software applications

1998-2002……<<<<<<<<<update

Page 152

 

 

 

Hardware / software database

1988-91 CROP and …….update

Page 153

Periodical reading. Business, Mfg., Engineering, Computers, & Operations literature

To 1997 and 97 to 2002...…update

Page 154

 

 



 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



 

 

 

 

Windows 3.1 and Operations Management

 

 

Windows NT 3.51 and Operations Management

 

Lotus SmartSuite w/ Windows 95

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Windows 95-98 w/ MS Office 97-2000

 

Windows 2000 and Office XP

 

The Business Plan

 

Flowchart ~ job placement


Project Mgmt.

 

Object linking and embedding

 

Visual Basic Programming-Finance applications.

 

 

Microsoft Excel

 

 

 

 

 

Lotus Spreadsheets

 

 

 

Custom screen using Visual Basic Programming.

 

 

Trouble shooting quality control methods,  fishbone chart.

 

 

 

MS Access Database development.

 

 

 

Company research using Access, Excel and Phonedisc(s)

 

 

 

 

MS Access data to Excel for analysis

 

 

MS Access report and form printouts.

 

 

Technician software for troubleshooting computers

 

 

Technician software continued.

 

 

Drafting software in 3D views.

 

 

MS Visual Basic application towards operations management needs.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MS Excel and 18 spreadsheets geared towards operations mgmt.

 

Manufacturing app in Windows Operating Systems

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MS Office Professional 95 and the Bindery.

 

 

Computer reseller industry periodicals.

 

 

Microfocus COBOL programming

1 Identification Division.

2 Program-id. Property Tax

3 Author. Lance Lawson.

4 Environment Division.

5 Configuration Section.

6 Source-Computer. IBM.

7 Object-Computer. IBM.

8 Input-Output Section.

9 File-Control.

10 Select Tax-Assess-File assign to ut-s-sysin.

11 Select Print-File assign to ut-s-sysout.

12 Data Division.

13 File Section.

14 FD Tax-Assess-File

15 Label record is omitted.

16 01 Tax-Assess.

17 05 Filler Pic x(6).

18 05 Prop-type-in Pic x.

19 05 Filler Pic x(6).

20 05 Name-in Pic x(20).

21 05 Filler Pic x(15).

22 05 Home-type-in Pic x.

23 05 Filler Pic x.

24 05 Comm-type-in Pic x.

25 05 Parcel-no-in.

26 10 Parcel-1-in Pic x(5).

27 10 Parcel-2-in Pic x.

28 10 Parcel-3-in Pic x(3).

29 05 Value-in Pic 9(6)v99.

30 FD Print-File

31 Label record is omitted.

32 01 print-rec Pic x(133).

33 Working-Storage Section.

34 77 EOF-FLAG Pic x(3) value 'no'.

35 77 Prop-Tax Pic 9(7)v99 value 0.

36 77 Line-Ctr Pic 99 value 40.

37 77 HPR-Total Pic 9(7)v99 value 0.

38 77 HNR-Total Pic 9(7)v99 value 0.

39 77 Bldg-Total Pic 9(7)v99 value 0.

40 77 Land-Total Pic 9(7)v99 value 0.

41 77 End-Total Pic 9(8)v99 value 0.

42 77 Tax-Rate Pic v999 value 0.

43 77 Qtr Pic x(6).

44 77 Type-code Pic 9 value 0.

45 77 Desc-out Pic x(6).

46 77 Page-no Pic 999………see web site for all.

 

POM 4530 ........MATERIALS AND PROCESS CONTROL

Productions and Operations Management.

 

Ch 1 .....MATERIAL ........MANAGEMENT

Ch 5 CAPACITY ....REQUIREMENTS ....PLANNING.

chap 9 ....INVENTORY .......FUNDAMENTALS

Ch 2..... PRODUCTION ...PLANNING SYSTEMS

Ch 6 CAPACITY ....MANAGEMENT

Order Quantities

Ch 3 ......MASTER ......PRODUCTION ......SCHEDULING

Ch 7 Making The Plan.

 

Ch 4 .....MATERIAL ....REQUIREMENT PLANNING

 

 

 

 

Notes Below in above order.

CH 1 DR. KHADE

 

INTRODUCTION TO MATERIAL MANAGEMENT

WEALTH IS MEASURED BY THE GNP.

 

VALUE IS ADDED AT EACH STEP IN THE MANUFACTURE PROCESS.

TO GET THE MOST , WE MUST BE MOST EFFICIENCE.

 

CONFLICTS IN TRADITIONAL SYSTEMS.

TO GET MOST PROFIT , COMPANY MUST

1. PROVIDE BEST CUSTOMER SERVICE

2. PROVIDE LOWEST PRODUCTION COSTS.

3. PROVIDE LOWEST INVENTORY INVESTMENT.

4. PROVIDE LOWEST DISTRIBUTION COSTS.

 

MARKETING WANTS:

1.HIGH INVENTORIES SO PRODUCT IS ALWAYS THERE.

2. INTERRUPT PRODUCTION LINES SO SPECIAL ITEMS CAN BE RUN.

3. EXTENSIVE AND COSTLY DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM SO PRODUCT CAN GET TO CUSTOMER AS FAST AS POSSIBLE.

 

FINANCE WANTS:

1. LOW INVENTORIES SINCE INVESTMENT IS AT MINIMUM.

2. DECREASE NUMBER OF PLANTS AND WAREHOUSES.

3. PRODUCE LARGE QUANTITIES WITH LONG PRODUCTION RUNS.

4. MANUFACTURE ONLY TO CUSTOMER ORDER.

 PRODUCTION WANTS:

1. LONG PRODUCTION RUNS OF FEW PRODUCTS.

2. HIGH INVENTORIES OF RAW MATERIALS SO WORK FLOW UNINTERRUPTED.

 

TO OPTIMIZE THIS YOU NEED GOOD COORDINATION OF ALL.

 POM 4530 ........MATERIALS AND PROCESS CONTROL .cont…

 

MATERIALS MANAGEMENT IS TO:

1. OPTIMIZE FIRMS RESOURCES

2. PROVIDE DESIRED LEVEL OF CUSTOMER SERVICE.

 

MANUFACTURING PLANNING AND CONTROL:

1. PRODUCTION PLANNING.

A. FORECASTING

B. MASTER PLANNING

C. MATERIAL PLANNING

D. CAPACITY PLANNING.

2. IMPLEMENTATION AND CONTROL ~ SHOP FLOOR CONTROL

3. INVENTORY MANAGEMENT.

 

INVENTORY TURNS=ANNUAL C.O.G.S./AVERAGE INVENTORY IN DOLLARS.

 

INPUTS TO THE MANUFACTURING PLANNING AND CONTROL SYSTEM.

1. PRODUCT DESCRIPTION : ~ BILL OF MATERIAL.

A. DESCRIBES THE COMPONENTS USED TO MAKE PRODUCT.

B. DESCRIBES THE SUB-ASSEMBLIES AT VARIOUS STAGES OF MFG.

 

2. PROCESS SPECIFICATIONS ~ STEPS NECESSARY TO FAB.

A. OPERATIONS REQUIRED TO FAB.

B. SEQUENCE OF OPERATIONS.

C. EQUIPMENT AND ACCESSORIES REQUIRED.

D. STANDARD TIME REQUIRED TO PERFORM EACH OPERATION.

 

3. TIME NEEDED TO FAB

= AVERAGE OPERATOR AT NORMAL PACE .

USUALLY STANDARD TIMES ARE FOUND IN ROUTING FILE.

 

4. AVAILABLE FACILITIES

MUST KNOW WHAT IS AVAILABLE. USUALLY IN WORK CENTER FILE.

 

5. QUANTITIES REQUIRED.

COMES FROM FORECASTS, CUSTOMER ORDERS, ORDERS TO REPLACE FINISHED GOODS INVENTORY AND MATERIAL REQUIREMENT PLAN.

 

PHYSICAL SUPPLY AND DISTRIBUTION

1. TRANSPORTATION

2. DISTRIBUTION INVENTORY

3. WAREHOUSING

4. PACKAGING

5. MATERIAL HANDLING

6. ORDER ENTRY……………….see web site for complete file.

 

POM 4530 ........MATERIALS AND PROCESS CONTROL...More

 

Ch 1 .....MATERIAL ........MANAGEMENT

Ch 5 CAPACITY ....REQUIREMENTS ....PLANNING.

chap 9 ....INVENTORY .......FUNDAMENTALS

Ch 2..... PRODUCTION ...PLANNING SYSTEMS

Ch 6 CAPACITY ....MANAGEMENT

Order Quantities

Ch 3 ......MASTER ......PRODUCTION ......SCHEDULING

Ch 7 Making The Plan.

CH 11... INDEPENDENT DEMAND ORDERING SYSTEMS.

Ch 4 .....MATERIAL ....REQUIREMENT PLANNING

 

CHAP 14 JUST IN TIME MANUFACTURING

Notes Below in above order.

 

Calculations used below.

 

Some math calculations:

OM 4530 TEST MATHEMATICS

chap 1 intro

inventory turns = annual C.O.G. sold / average inventory in dollars.

Chap 2 production planning

Level production plan = total product + back orders + ending inventory - opening inventory.

Or total forecast + opening backlog - opening backlog.

Chap 3 MPS.

Available to promise = period 1 = on hand- customer orders before next MPS.

Period 2 = MPS sch. Receipt - customer orders due before next MPS.

Chap 5. Capacity.

Utilization = hours worked / available hours.

Efficiency = (std. Hrs of worked produced / hours actually worked) * 100.

Rated capacity = available time *utilization * efficiency.

Required capacity.

Setup time + run time. And Actual time * efficiency * utilization.

Chap 8 forecasting.

Exponential smoothing = (alpha * latest demand) + (1 - alpha)(previous forecast).

Seasonal Index = period average demand / aveage demand for all periods OR per.avg.dmd / deseasonalized dmd.

Seasonal forecasts = seasonal index * deseasonalized demand

deseasonalized demand = actual seasonal demand / seasonal index.

MAD = sum of absolute deviations / number of observations.

Tracking signal = sum of forecast errors / MAD.

Chap 9 Inventory fundamentals.

Transportation inventory = I=tA/365 t=time in days,A=annual demand.

Carrying costs = cost of capital % * storage cost %*risk cost %.

Cost of placing order.= fixed costs / number of orders) + variable costs.

POM 4530 ........MATERIALS AND PROCESS CONTROL...More. Calculations

 

Chap 10 order quantities.

EOQ= Q= sqrt(2AS/ic) A=annual demand,S=order cost in $,(I) carrying cost %,c = unit cost in dollars.

Non-instantaneous receipt=EOQ= sqrt(2AS/ic(1-d/p). .d=usage rate, p= production rate.

Use of EOQ when costs not known= Q=sqrt(2Asub dS) or K=(sqrt A subd)/N N= orders per year.

Period order quantity = EOQ/average weekly usage.

Chap 11 independent demand ordering systems.

Order point=DDLT+SS, DDLT= demand during lead time. SS = safety stock.

Average inventory=(Q/2) + SS Q= order quantity.

Average or mean = sum of x/n n = total number of data.

Mad= sum of absolute deviations/ number of observations. Remember 1MAD,2MAD,3MAD.

MAD for LT1= MAD for FI * sqrt (LT1/F1).

Target level or maximum level inventory. T=D(R+L)+SS. D=demand per unit time, L=lead time duration, R=review period duration, SS= safety stock.

ORDER QUANtity from above = Q=T-I. I = inventory on hand.

 

 

 

 

See my web for complete notes.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Production Planning with Excel-Lotus-Linear programming programs

 

 

 

Max profit using Linear Programming

 

 

 

 

 

 

continued next sheet……..

chart next sheet ……..

 

 

 

 

 

 

Operations Planning

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Finance and Lotus

 

Process Analysis
Industrial Engineering and Process Improvements.
Study Topics

What is I.E.

Method Improvement Techniques.

WORK MEASUREMENT TECHNIQUES.

MAKING IMPROVEMENTS BY THE RULES.

EVERY FACTORY IS A MOUNTAIN OF GOLD.

CHAPTER 2 PROCESS IMPROVEMENT STEPS.

OCCURRENCE AND DISCOVERY OF PROBLEMS.

PQCDSM CHECKLIST.

ANALYZING CURRENT CONDITIONS.

ANALYZE THE FACTS AS THEY ARE.

USE QUANTITATIVE DATA TO DESCRIBE THE PROBLEM POINTS.

USE SYMBOLS AND GRAPHS TO DESCRIBE PROBLEMS.

IDENTIFYING MAJOR PROBLEM POINTS.

DRAFTING AN IMPROVEMENT PLAN.

IMPLEMENTING AND EVALUATING THE IMPROVEMENT PLAN.

FOLLOW UP MEASURES.

CHAPTER 3 PROCESS ANALYSIS.

WHAT IS PROCESS ANALYSIS.

THE PURPOSE OF PROCESS ANALYSIS.

TYPES OF PROCESS ANALYSIS.

PROCESS CHART SYMBOLS.

TYPES OF PROCESS ANALYSIS.

 

CHAPTER 4 PRODUCT PROCESS ANALYSIS.

WHAT IS PROCESS ANALYSIS.

LINEAR PROCESSES.

CONVERGING PROCESSES.

BRANCHING PROCESSES.

COMPOUND PROCESSES.

THE PURPOSE OF PRODUCT ANALYSIS.

STEPS IN PROCESS ANALYSIS.

CONDUCT A PRELIMINARY STUDY.

DRAW UP A PROCESS FLOW CHART.

RECORD MEASUREMENTS FOR ALL REQUIRED ITEMS IN EACH PROCESS.

ORGANIZE THE ANALYSIS RESULTS.

DRAFT AN IMPROVEMENT PLAN. 

IMPLEMENT AND EVALUATE THE IMPROVEMENT PLAN.

STANDARDIZE THE IMPROVEMENT PLAN.

EXAMPLES OF PRODUCT PROCESS ANALYSIS.

See my web site for complete.

Productivity though Process Analysis : Productivity Management

 

Industrial Engineering for the shop floor.

 

 

Ch 1 ....IE and Process .............Improvements

Ch 4 .........Product Process .........................Analysis

Ch 7 ......Clerical Process
....................Analysis

Ch 2 .....Process .......Improvement Steps

Ch 5 .....Operator Process ...................Analysis

Ch 8.....Process Analysis
................Case Studies

Ch 3 ...Process Analysis

Ch 6 ....Joint Process .............Analysis

Notes below

IE and Process Improvements

Industrial Engineering is a group of techniques that are used to eliminate the BIG THREE OF WASTE. WASTE, INCONSISTENCIES, and IRRATIONALITIES.

Method improvement techniques.

Process analysis / Motion study / Conveyance and equipment layout.

Work measurement techniques:

time studies.

can be used alone but compliment each other. also closely interrelated.

process analysis is most valuable tool for studying flow in operations.

rules

follow improvement steps.

use improvement steps.

 IE is a hands on activity. Learn by practicing it.

 Seven Quality Control Tools.

(cause and effect diagrams)= Pareto diagrams / check sheets / histograms / scatter diagrams / graphs and management charts / stratification.

 Start by 1. understanding the facts. / improvement is limitless /

 In manufacturing PROCESS ANALYSIS is the most fundamental method in carrying out the never ending processing improvements.

 CHAP 2 PROCESS IMPROVEMENT STEPS.

first must grasp an understanding of the current situation.

 1. discovery of problem. what needs improvement.

2. Analysis of the current conditions. how are things done now ?

3. I.D. of major problem points. what is the improvement goal and where do the BIG THREE problems exist.

4. creation of the improvement plan. what must be done to eliminate the BIG THREE problems.

5. Implementation and evaluation of the improvement plan. did it work?

6. follow up measures. STANDARDIZE the plan / prevent backsliding.

IMPROVEMENTS ARE INFINITE, GO BACK AND FIND NEXT PROBLEM.

 1. DISCOVERY OF PROBLEMS.

Better to find problems yourself, solve problems in making before major problem.

look at statistical indicators of the past (capacity utilization,yield,unit cost,efficiency). other companies, compare.

IDENTIFYING PROBLEMS. PQCDSM Checklist.

PRODUCTIVITY = lately lower?,can it be raised?, worker productivity.

Process analysis cont…

 

QUALITY = up/down,be improved, more customer complaints.

COST= up/down,materials cost increases?

DELIVERY = more late deliveries, lead time be shortened?

SAFETY = accidents increased?,unsafe work practices?

MORALE = up/down,interpersonal problems? right job assignments.

Find the BASIC problem(s) , make priority list of them if needed.

2. ANALYZING CURRENT CONDITIONS

Analyze the facts as they are. your eyes are crucial to maintain objectivity.

Use QUANTITATIVE DATA to describe problem points. ~ tons per hour,meters per trip.

See web site for complete file.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Productivity Management Summary: CONDENSED VERSION

Operations Management

 8 step Process

PURPOSE OF Product Process Analysis FIND.

Unnecessary Delay Points

        1. Unnecessary Transportation Trips

Unnecessary Long Transportation Trips

Problems caused by choice of Transportation.

Opportunities to combine Inspection and Operations.

While Studying

Equipment Layout

Sequence of Work

Distribution of Workload.

 

7 step process

Steps in Process Analysis

Preliminary Study.

2. Draw Process Flow Chart.

Recording of all Measurements.

Organize the Analysis Results.

Draft Improvement Plan

Implement and Evaluate Improvement Plan.

Standardize Plan.

4 Types of Process Charts.

Linear

3. Converging.

Branching.

Compound a. returns @ same place. B. returns @ Downstream.

4 types of Process Analysis

Product Process.

4. Operator Process.

5. Joint Process. A. operator-machine b. several workers.

6. Clerical Analysis.

Purpose of Joint Process Analysis.

Eliminate Machine Idle Time.

7. Eliminate Operator Idle Time.

8. Equalize Workload among Resources.

9. Optimize Amount of Machines to Operators.

10. Optimize Amount of Operators to Machines.

Steps in Operator-Machine Analysis JOINT analysis steps are the same.

Preliminary Study

11. Analyze one Operation Cycle.

Arrange Timing………see my web site for complete file.

Productivity Management Summary: CONDENSED VERSION

Operations Management……..cont……..

Measure Time at Each Operation Step.

Draw uo Operator-Machine Chart.

Organize the Analysis Results.

Work out Improvement Plan.

Implement and Evaluate the Improvement Plan.

Standardize the Improvement.

BIG THREE Waste,Inconsistencies,Irrationalities.

METHOD IMPROVEMENT Process Analysis,Motion Study,Conveyance and Equipment Layout.

WORK MEASUREMENT Time Studies.

Use alone but complement each other and are interrelated.

RULES Follow and use Improvement Steps.

Learn I.E. buy practicing it.

SEVEN Q/C TOOLS. Cause/effect diagrams,pareto chart,check sheets,histograms,scatter

diagrams,graphs and charts,stratification.

PROCESS IMPROVEMENT STEPS. Discovery,analysis,ID,improve-plan,implement,standardize.

 

see my web site for complete file.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Operator Analysis.

Industrial Engineering.

Operator Analysis

The process was making anti-fog glass. Multiple sheets of glass were used with a heating wire stretched between them. Electrodes were then connected for successful operation. 

The operation included 19 steps with fabrication, 18 transportation trips and a single inspection. The author was impressed with the amount of transportation trips necessary, I was not. A total of 81 meters were covered by the operator during this operation.

The improvement plan was to stop the excessive trips needed to get small items for the process. This would not only save foot traffic but cut traffic considerably for the operator. The layout of supporting material was changed and some pieces were precut and the dispensers put on wheels.

The improvement was a reduction of steps by 30 percent but the most saving were in distances covered which saved foot traffic by 50 %. The overall time saving was also 50%. 

There is still to much transportation going on. A conveyor system ,maybe portable could be used. Consolidate some of these processes into a single workstation where not only speed will increase but so will worker endurance. Maybe larger tables and more carts for supplies and materials were help. I would believe there is no reason to bring anything back to a previous workstation, unless the processes require high heat or dangerous methods for completion. If an operator has to travel ,it should be for his vacation.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Product Process Analysis. 

Industrial Engineering.

The example in the book was an eight step process and the plan was to reduce the "big three" of waste. The Engineers decided to work on processes four though eight before their preliminary studies began.

The preliminary study (product process chart) showed several areas of concern with the "delay sites" being of prime interest. The first fact was simply reduce the number of the delay sites. There were a total of 21 steps from sub-assembly to warehouse storage. The engineers summarized their data in a data chart (a summary off the product process chart) and a flow diagram of the manufacturing facility and it’s work stations.

With this data in hand, the brain storming sessions were next with the concerned parties present. The conclusion was a reduction in transportation delays (on carts) of seven times to two times (reduction of 71%). This was achieved by combining the processing steps five thought eight (product process chart) and eliminating steps 10 and 16 altogether.

There was a moderate adjustment in the work flow process with inspection and finishing tables being moved. The saving was by minutes around 54 %. By the steps necessary there was a reduction of 7 steps.

Further improvement could be realized (perhaps) by a conveyor going right down the middle of the work stations and tables. This could cut down considerably on manual movement since pushing all these carts must be time consuming (along with taking the worker away from their work area and mind thought). This would require more modification of the work stations and the additional cost of the conveyor. The expense however would be minimal since table resetting is easy and the conveyor would be "gravity operated" (on a slope).

Project Example, actual for me. (work experience)

Project is taken from my experience in fabricating high pressure water cleaners. These devices which use a wand similar to a car wash produced 500, 750 and 1000 pounds of pressure and worked with water temperatures up to 190 degrees. They were made for small business including restaurants, garages and a long list of applications. The owner could spray not only water but fertilizer, seeding and detergents. The washers used 110 volt and were the size of 18 inches wide , 30 inches long and 20 inches tall.

 Fabrication steps.

The washer case was made from 16 gauge cold roll steel. There was a stiffener installed in the bottom of the case for the motor and pump to bolt to. There was also a stiffener on one side of the case for the simple electrical needs of the device.

Step 1: The metal was sheered to the proper size and all edges were checked for exposure to the user and sanded if necessary. This step could often be skipped if the material was sheered with the proper side up.

Step 2: The flat cut pieces of metal were then laid out for punching and bending procedures.

Step 3: Then punching was first for electrical conduits and the cases bent on the pressbrake for correct shape.

Step 4: The painting was the next step with all prepping and sanding if necessary completed.

Step 5: Assembly took place at this time with the pump and motor assembly being first. The electrical box and motor hook-ups were completed.

Step 6: Testing and general operation were the last steps before crating the product.

Step 7: Hose assembly and wands were packed along side of the product and decals and company logo were the final step before the boxing of product.

The overall plan beside direct sales to industry was to market these products in lumber stores and the like for the home user to apply toward pool decking and general cleaning. The washers were made in lots ranging from 250 to 1000. The idea never did materialize and the line was shut down within two years. The products seemed practical but maybe the marketing sucked, I just know we had few returns and fabricating costs were not high. (my pay-stub)

 

Product Process Analysis. 

Industrial Engineering….cont……

 

Clerical Analysis

Preliminary Study:

List types of records, frequency, quantity, purpose.

The types of work done and the time required.

The flow of records and other information, conveyance methods, and time requirements.

Record creation methods (hand, cross checking, photocopying and it’s time requirements)

The relation between clerical processes and the items being processed.

 Problems

Time from ordering to shipping.

Time from shipping department to actual shipping and delivery notices.

Amount of records and the different types of the records.

Amount of memos, and the overall amount of hand copying.

Handwriting methods and the methods of them.

The departments doing the work and the departments doing the paperwork (different).

 Solutions

Instead of hand copying, go to a voucher system which is actually used for data entry.

Putting processes into a duplicate type of paperwork (every piece can bring errors).

Consolidate similar receipts which reduced cross-over data.

Effects

Shipment lead time reduced from 6 days to 4.

Three type of records eliminated, along with the memos and hand copying.

Remove handwriting methods.

Shipping methods and delivery notices improved.

1996 methods.

Bar-coding and scanning though out material flow and assembly.

Vouches in a (six-pack) which are removed and inputted as needed along path.

Paper receipts in 5 part forms when hard copy is required (also a second check method).

Network electronic forms which are on the network from factory floor to the CEO office.

Email and other software which will increase communications from shop floors to offices.

RF transmitters on forklifts and trucks which are transmitting to shop floor computers.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Industrial engineering..load distance

Industrial engineering

 

Industrial engineering..operator

 

 

Industrial engineering

Clerical operations analysis

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Quality Control, Charts, Methods, People

CHAP 1

 14 POINTS FOR MANAGEMENT

1. CREATE CONTINUOUS PURPOSE TOWARD IMPROVEMENT AND SERVICE.

TO BECOME COMPETITIVE AND STAY IN BUSINESS.

2. ADOPT THE NEW PHILOSOPHY , THE NEW ECONOMIC AGE AND TAKE ON LEADERSHIP FOR CHANGE.

A. PEOPLE ARE BEST MOTIVATED BY SHEER JOY.

B. MANAGE THE PROCESS AND RESULTS.

C. MANAGE SO EVERYONE WINS NOT JUST SHAREHOLDERS.

D. COOPERATION WORKS BETTER THAN COMPETITION.

3. STOP DEPENDENCE ON INSPECTION TO ACHIEVE QUALITY.

A. THIS DOES NOTHING TO MAKE THEM BETTER.

4. END PRACTICE OF REWARDING BUSINESS BY PRICE ALONE.

A. MINIMIZE TOTAL COST BY BUILDING TRUST WITH ONE.

 5. IMPROVE CONSTANTLY PRODUCTION AND SERVICE.

A. MGMT. KNOW BETWEEN SPECIAL / COMMON VARIATIONS.

B. MGMT.AGREE ON DEFINITIONS OF OPERATIONS.

C. SDSA=STANDARDIZE, DO, STUDY, ACT.

D. PDSA=PLAN, DO, STUDY, ACT. -DEMING-

E. EMPOWERMENT

 6. TRAINING ON THE JOB.

A. EMPLOYEES ARE MOST IMPORTANT ASSET TO FIRM.

B. FORMAL AND THEORY TRAINING.

C. EXPERIENCE W/O THEORY WILL NOT GIVE A PERSON PREDICTIONS ON NEXT EVENTS.

 7. INSTITUTE LEADERSHIP

A. MUST BE SOMEWHAT CAPABLE OF PREDICTING FUTURE.

8. DRIVE OUT FEAR.

~SECURITY, PHYSICAL HARM, UNKNOWN GOALS, SHORTCOMING IN HIRING/TRAINING, POOR SUPERVISION, FAIL TO MEET QUOTAS, BLAMED FOR PROBLEMS OF THE SYSTEM, FAULTY INSPECTION METHODS.

A. MANAGEMENT JOB PERIOD.

9. BREAK DOWN BARRIERS BETWEEN DEPARTMENTS.

10. ELIMINATE SLOGANS, TARGETS, ZERO DEFECTS.

A. THESE ARE NOT METHODS.

11.STOP WORK STANDARDS OR QUOTAS ON FACTORY FLOOR.

A. THESE ARE NEGATIVE.

B. HAVE NO BEARING ON THE PROCESS ITSELF.

11B. STOP MANAGEMENT BY OBJECTIVE. (NUMBERS AND GOALS)

SUBSTITUTE LEADERSHIP.

A. GOALS AND TARGETS ARE DYSFUNCTIONAL. DO NOT AID LEARNING.

STEALS PRIDE OF WORKMANSHIP / AIDS THE "EVIL OF MGMT" THOUGHTS.

KNOW THEORY’S ROLE IN DECISION MAKING.

12. REMOVE BARRIERS THAT ROB WORKER OF PRIDE OF WORKMANSHIP.

~ ~UNKNOWN MISSION, NOT USING SKILLS, BLAMING THEM, POOR EQUIPMENT.

NO APPRAISAL SYSTEM / THIS FOCUSES ON SHORT TERM.

14. TAKE ACTION TO ACCOMPLISH THE TRANSFORMATION……….see my web site for ALL..

 

Quality Control in Operations Management

Quality Control in Operations Management

Quality Control in Operations Management

Quality Control in Operations Management

Project management

Project management “crashing” cont…….

Production spreadsheet – job status

Production spreadsheet – team building

Excel and machine database for maintenance schedule, minimize downtime.

 

 

Excel-Lotus spreadsheet with shop cost in consumables

Excel-Lotus spreadsheet with shop estimate on work

Project management spreadsheet

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Computer Information Systems,

(CIS) with System Analysis and Design

 

ch 1 Role of System Analysis

ch 9 Data Flow Diagrams

ch 17 Designing DataBases

ch 2 Impact of Information sys

ch 10 Analyzing Systems

ch 18 Design User Interface

ch 3 Feasibility and Managing.

ch 11 Process Specifications

ch 19 Data Entry Planning

ch 4 Investigating hard data

ch 12 Decision support Sys

ch 20 Quality Assurance

ch 5 Interviewing

ch 13 The Proposal

ch 21 Implementing System

ch 6 Using Questionnaires

ch 14 Write-Presenting propo

ch 22 Object-Oriented sys

ch 7 Observing Behavior

ch 15 Designing Output

Topics / Notes Below

Ch 8 Prototyping

ch 16 Designing Input

Hand notes here…..

Chap 1. Assuming the role as Systems Analyst.

Information as a organizational resource.

Managing information as a resource.

Managing computer-generated information.

System analysis and design concepts.

Transaction processing systems.

Office automation systems and knowledge work systems.

Management information systems.

Decision support systems.

Expert systems and artificial intelligence.

Group decision support systems.

Executive support systems.

Need for system analysis and design.

End users.

Role of the Systems Analysis

System analysis as a consultant.

System analysis as a supporting expert.

System analyst as a agent of change.

Qualities of the system analyst.

The systems development life cycle.

Identifying problems, opportunities, and objectives.

Determining information requirements.

Analyzing system needs.

Designing the recommended system.

Developing and documenting software.

Testing and maintaining the system.

Implementing and evaluating the system.

The impact of maintenance.

Increasing analyst productivity.

Improving analyst - user communication.

Providing a means of communication.

Integrating life cycle activities.

Accurately assessing maintenance changes

UPPER AND LOWER CASE.

Upper case tools.

Lower case tools.

Software Reverse engineering and reengineering.

Object oriented systems analysis and design. see my web site for complete file.

Learning Objectives for Database Management Systems.

 

ch 1 DataBase Environment

ch 6 Logical Design

ch 11 Advanced Features

ch 2 DataBase Application

ch 7 Physical Design

ch 12 Data Administration

ch 3 DataBase Development

ch 8 SQL

ch 13 Client Server

ch 4 Entity-Relationship

ch 9 Implementing

ch 14 Hierarchical Systems

ch 5 Object Oriented Model

ch 10 Query by Example.

ch 15 CODASYL Systems

Chap 1

List six basic principles of information resource management.

Contrast centralized and distributed databases and describe two types of distributed databases.

List major characteristics of file processing systems and list several shortcomings of these systems.

List major advantages of a database processing approach compared to the traditional file processing systems.

Draw a high level enterprise data model for a simple organization.

Describe the major components of a database environment.

Contrast a process driven approach to a data driven approach to information system development.

Chapter 2

Identify the steps in the development of a database.

Variety of skills needed to develop and design a database application.

List the Rudimentary features of a database management system.

Explain the various components of a DBMS including tools to assist in nonprocedural programming.

List types of Relational database mgmt. Systems and the relational database query languages.

Read entity-relational diagrams and draw simple entity relationship diagram to describe a database.

Chapter 4.

Draw an entity-relationship (E-R) diagram to represent common business situations.

Define unary, binary and ternary relationships and an example of each.

Model multivalued attributes and repeating groups in an E-R diagram.

Model simple time dependent data using time stamps in an E-R diagram.

Model ISA relationships in an E-R diagram.

Define four basic types of business rules in a E-R diagram.

List advantages of locating business rules in repository rather than in application programs.

Chapter 5.

Draw an object oriented data model (OODM) to represent common business situations.

Describe important data types that can be managed using object oriented technology.

List 5 limitations or concerns regarding object oriented database management systems.

Give examples of generalization, specialization and inheritance.

Draw a message map of an object oriented data model.

Chapter 6.

Describe 4 steps in a logical database design.

List 5 properties of relations.

Define 2 properties that are essential for a candidate key.

Concise definition for first normal form=

2nd normal form=

third normal form=

 SEE WEB SITE FOR ALL

 

Database design using an E-R diagram and data tables below.

 

 

Database report printouts, MS Access

A few SQL-database related terms, see web for more

 

aggregate functions

back end

common key.
concurrency

dirty pages.
dumps.

OLTP.

allocation unit

batch

concurrent access

explicit transaction

packet errors

application log

base datatype

correlated subquery

float datatype

permissions.

application programming interface (API)

binding.
bit
datatype.

Boolean expression.

data dictionary.
data synchronization.
database language.

inner join.
latency.
logical operators.
nested query.

online transaction processing (OLTP).
remote procedure call (RPC).

automated server restart

cascading delete.
cascading updates.

delimiter. direct response mode.

object permissions.
ODBC driver.

replication.
SQL Service Manager

 

 

 

 

 

 

Database programming using Access, Unix on HP 9000.

 

 

Database programming using Access, Unix on HP 9000. continued..

 

 

Decision Support Systems, Expert Systems-find quota

 

 

Decision Support Systems, Expert Systems-find quota..cont.

 

 

 

 

Decision Support Systems, Expert Systems-find best investment(s)

 

 

 

 

see next sheet

 

Decision Support Systems, Expert Systems-find investment cont…

 

 

 

 

Decision Support Systems, Expert Systems-find production batch

DECISION SUPPORT SYSTEMS AND EXPERT SYSTEMS

 

ch 1 Introduction to DSS

ch 8 Implementing

ch 15 Expert systems outside

ch 2 Decision Processes

ch 9 Representational Models

ch 16 Expert systems inside

ch 3 Systems and Models

ch 10 Optimizations

ch 17 Building an Expert Syste

ch 4 Types of DSS's

ch 11 Group Decision System

ch 18 Expert System Cases

ch 5 Building an DSS

ch 12 Executive Info Systems

Pulling it all together

ch 6 DSS Software tools.

ch 13 DSS Cases

 

ch 7 DSS Hardware

ch 14 Artificial Intelligence

 

 CHAPTER 1 INTRODUCTION.

 EVOLUTION OF INFORMATION SYSTEMS.

WHAT IS A DSS.

DSS IN THE INFORMATION SYSTEMS PICTURE.

TYPES OF INFORMATION SYSTEMS.

INFORMATION SYSTEMS AND DECISION SUPPORT.

USING COMPUTERS FOR DECISION SUPPORT.

THE VALUE OF COMPUTER BASED DECISION SUPPORT.

SPECIFIC DSS BENEFITS.

IMPROVING PERSONAL EFFICIENCY.

EXPEDITING PROBLEM SOLVING.

WHY STUDY DSS.

THE PLAN OF THIS BOOK.

SUMMARY.

CHAPTER 2 HUMAN DECISION MAKING PROCESSES.

WHAT IS A DECISION.

THE DECISION PROCESS.

THE INTELLIGENCE PHASE.

THE DESIGN PHASE.

THE IMPORTANCE OF CREATIVITY.

THE CHOICE PHASE.

TYPES OF DECISIONS.

HOW MANAGERS MAKE DECISIONS.

THE RATIONAL MANAGER.

SUBJECTIVE UTILITY.

SYSTEMATIC DECISION MAKING.

SATISFICING.

ORGANIZATIONAL AND POLITICAL DECISION MAKING.

THE IMPACT OF PHYCHOLOGICAL TYPE ON DECISION MAKING.

THE KEPNER-TREGOE DECISION MAKING METHOD.

STATE THE PURPOSE OF THE DECISION.

ESTABLISH OBJECTIVES.

CLASSIFY ACCORDING TO IMPORTANCE.

IDENTIFY MUST OBJECTIVES.

IDENTIFY WANT OBJECTIVES.

QUANTIFY WANT OBJECTIVES.

GENERATE ALTERNATIVES.

COMPARE WITH WANT OBJECTIVES.

UNITE SEPARATE JUDGMENTS.

TENTATIVELY CHOOSE THE BEST ALTERNATIVE.

LIST POSSIBLE ADVERSE CONSEQUENCES………. see my web site for complete file.

 

Linear Programming code ~ management science

Max profit

@LP : 2-14

2 3 NO MAX

ALPHA 4 BETA-5 CONST TYPE R H S RANGE

OBJ COEFF 1200 1800 XXXX XXXX XXXX

MIN-PROD 1 0 >= 10 .

MIN-PROD2 0 1 >= 15 .

LABORHRS 20 25 = 800 .

VARBL TYPE POS POS XXXX XXXX XXXX

LOWR BOUND . . XXXX XXXX XXXX

UPPR BOUND . . XXXX XXXX XXXX

INIT SOLN 0 0 XXXX XXXX XXXX

 

 

Assembly line balancing

 

@ALB : BAR-B-Q Grill Company

21 3 1.000000

TASK NUMBR TASK TIME PRED 1 PRED 2 PRED 3

CHECK PTS 1 0.630000 . . .

TOP>SIDE 2 1.000000 1 . .

HOLDER 1 3 0.330000 2 . .

HOLDER 2 4 0.330000 2 . .

INSP HOOD 5 0.080000 3 4 .

MOUNT BRK 6 1.000000 1 . .

RACK>BOWL 7 0.080000 6 . .

INSP BOWL 8 0.050000 7 . .

LEGS>TOP 9 1.500000 1 . .

BRACE LEGS 10 2.000000 9 . .

WHEEL 1 11 0.500000 10 . .

WHEEL 2 12 0.500000 10 . .

WHEEL 3 13 0.500000 10 . .

INSP BASE 14 0.170000 11 12 13

PRONGS 15 0.200000 1 . .

MOTOR 16 0.050000 15 . .

INSP ROTIS 17 0.050000 16 . .

HOOD>BOWL 18 1.000000 5 8 .

BASE>BOWL 19 2.000000 14 18 .

ROTIS>HOLD 20 0.050000 19 . .

FINAL INSP 21 0.500000 20 . .

18 .

ROTIS>HOLD 20 0.05000000 . 19 .

FINAL INSP 21 0.50000000 20 . .

19 .

FINAL INSP 21 0.50000000 20 . .

 

Linear programming.

@LP : LAWSON-BLENDING2

4 4 NO MIN

1REGULAR 1PREMIUM 2REGULAR 2PREMIUM CONST TYPE R H S RANGE

OBJ COEFF 30 30 34.8 34.8 XXXX XXXX XXXX

DEMAND-REG 1 0 1 0 >= 25000 .

DEMAND-PRE 0 1 0 1 >= 32000 ………..see web site for all.

Management Science ~ notes below Index. Index = optimization

 

Ch 1 Introduction

Ch 7 Integer-Goal Programming

Ch 13 Simulation

 

Ch 2 Linear Programming

Ch 8 Network Models

Ch 14 Fundamentals of Decision Analysis

Ch 3 Linear Prog.Application

Ch 9 Project Management

Ch 15 Decision Trees, Multifactor decision making.

Ch 4 Linear Prog.Simplex

Ch 10 Inventory Control

Ch 16 Forecasting

Ch 5 Sensitivity Analysis

Ch 11 Inventory models II

Ch 17 Markov Analysis

Ch 6 Transportation / Assignment

Ch 12 Waiting Lines:
Query theory

Ch 18 Dynamic Programming

Management Science 6/96

CSUS COURSE OM 3000

CHAP 1 INTRODUCTION What is management science.

Application : New York city. Problem.

Tackling the problem.

The Quantitative analysis approach.

Defining the problem.

Developing the model.

Acquiring input data.

Developing a solution.

Testing a solution.

Analyzing the results.

Implementing the results.

OVERVIEW OF THIS BOOK.

Linear programming.

Other mathematical programming topics.

Network models and project management.

Inventory control.

Queuing theory and simulation.

Decision theory.

Forecasting.

Markov Analysis.

Dynamic programming.

Possible problems in the QA approach.

Defining the problem.

APOLLO launches and success example.

Conflicting viewpoints.

Impact on other departments.

Beginning assumptions. Solution outdated.

 

Management Science ~ notes below Index. Index = optimization..cont…

 

DEVELOPING a model fitting the text book models.

Understanding a model.

ACQUIRING input data.

Using accounting data.

Validity of data.

DEVELOPING A SOLUTION. Hard to stand mathematics.

Only one answer is limiting.

TESTING THE SOLUTION.

Analyzing the results.

Implementation- not just the final step…….see my  web site for complete.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Management Science Projects (Intense Models) Terms and Methods.

LINEAR PROGRAMMING

Requirements of a linear programming model.

assumptions of linear programming.

Linear programming beginnings.

Formulating linear programming

Graphical solution to above.

ISO PROFIT LINE solution method.

THE CORNER POINT SOLUTION METHOD.

Solving Minimization problems.

Using the corner point for a solution.

Using the ISO COST APPROACH.

Summary of the graphical solution method.

Special issues in linear programming.

INFEASIBILITY.

UNBOUNDEDNESS.

REDUNDANCY.

ALTERNATIVE OPTIMAL SOLUTIONS.

TERMS.

LINEAR PROGRAMMING.

MATHEMATICAL PROGRAMMING.

OBJECTIVE FUNCTION.

CONSTRAINT.

INEQUALITY.

PRODUCT MIX PROBLEM.

NON NEGATIVITY CONSTRAINTS.

FEASIBLE REGION.

FEASIBLE SOLUTION.

INFEASIBLE SOLUTION.

ISO-PROFIT LINE.

CORNER POINT OR EXTREME POINT.

CORNER POINT METHOD.

SIMULTANEOUS EQUATION METHOD.

ISO COST LINE.

INFEASIBILITY.

UNBOUNDEDNESS.

REDUNDANCY.

ALTERNATIVE OPTIMAL SOLUTION.

LINEAR PROGRAMMING APPLICATIONS.

MARKETING SELECTION.

MARKETING RESEARCH.

MANUFACTURING APPLICATIONS.

PRODUCTION SCHEDULING.

DOUBLE SUB SCRIPTED VARIABLES.

INVENTORY CONSTRAINTS.

EMPLOYEE SCHEDULING APPLICATIONS.

ASSIGNMENT PROBLEMS……….see my web for complete.

 

 

Management Science Projects (Intense Models) Terms and Methods.

LINEAR PROGRAMMING…….cont….

 

LABOR PLANNING.

CREW OPTIMIZING.

FINANCIAL APPLICATIONS.

TRANSPORTATION APPLICATIONS.

INGREDIENT BLENDING APPLICATIONS.

INGREDIENT MIX AND BLENDING PROBLEMS.

SIMPLEX METHOD

INTERESTING NOTES

LINEAR PROGRAMMING: SENSITIVITY ANALYSIS AND DUALITY.

SENSITIVITY ANALYSIS.

CHANGES IN THE OBJECTIVE FUNCTION COEFFICIENT.

CHANGES IN THE TECHNOLOGICAL COEFFICIENT.

CHANGES IN THE RESOURCES OR RIGHT SIDE VALUES.

RIGHT HAND SIDE RANGING.

THE DUAL IN LINEAR PROGRAMMING.

DUAL FORMULATION PROCEDURES.

COMPUTATIONAL ADVANTAGE OF THE DUAL.

TERMS.

SENSITIVITY ANALYSIS.

RANGE OF INSIGNIFICANCE.

RANGE OF OPTIMALITY.

RIGHT HAND SIDE RANGES.

PRIMARY DUAL RELATIONSHIP.

TRANSPORTATION ASSIGNMENT PROBLEMS.

INTRODUCTION.

TRANSPORTATION MODEL.

ASSIGNMENT MODEL.

SPECIAL PURPOSE ALGORITHMS.

SETTING UP TRANSPORTATION PROBLEM.

INITIAL SOLUTION.

STEPPING STONE METHOD..

TESTING THE SOLUTION

KEY IDEA.

IMPROVED SOLUTION.

KEY IDEAS.

MODI METHODS.

MODI METHOD.~APPROACH.

SOLVING WITH MODI.

THE HUNGARIAN METHOD………see web site for all.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Management Science and minimizing mfg cost

 

 

Management Science and optimizing a plant move.

 

Management Science and optimizing machine selection ~assignment programming.

 

Management Science and minimization of shipping costs.

 

Management Science and scheduling employees, 3 examples.

 

 

Management Science and minimizing waiting times. 2 examples.

Management Science and goal programming, 1st goal, 2nd goal, etc..

 

 

 

Management Science and minimizing mfg cost.

 

 

Management Science and inventory management

 

 

 

 

 

 

Management Science and production scheduling to minimize cost.

 

Executive information systems (EIS)

Executive information systems

Management Science and minimizing labor cost

 

Management Science and minimizing school district labor cost.

 

 

Finance and unequal lives.

 

 

Computer Information Systems and Case analysis studies

CIS 4710 Case Analysis p.87, Ecologix Technologies Lance Lawson

 Background facts:…………selected text

Ecologix Technologies began it’s start in the 1940’s as a grain warehousing organization. In 1979 the owner had passed away and left the firm to his brother. The brother, Myron was also of age and had no desire to take on this position. However, his son (Gregg) which had a formal education and had proved himself in business received half the stock of the company from his father, Myron. Gregg’s success was in retailing products in the supermarket arena and he had worked himself up to president. Shortly after accepting this position from his father, he purchased a controlling interest in the supermarket chain. The acquisitions had begun and in a short time, the organization had became a conglomerate with nine subsidiary units. The different divisions compliment each other except for the oil and gas company which is owned. A new executive vice president was hired (Jay) which also had a successful background and in turn he had hired his past associate (Glenn) from his banking experience. Glenn is the director of information services and faces the task of turning IS from a support division to a strategic division.

Follow up to Problems:

Glenn immediately made his presence known buy purchasing a additional main-frame computer which would increase processing capability by sixty percent and doubling personnel in the department of information services. Even with this action, the IS department had a hard time keeping up with the necessary tasks. Data entry still took the required 40 hour week and overtime was taking another 20 hour a week. Still everything was classed as OK and top management saw no problem.

The director and the managers of the different accounting departments do not have degrees in accounting and the more Jay (executive vice president) learned about the situation, the more concerned he became.

The books had never balanced, and with the rapid growth that took place, the problems had

been multiplying. Jay decided a house cleaning was in order and begun by hiring a formally trained accountant named Doris Hill. Doris’s position was chief accountant. Doris reorganized the department and made accounting training mandatory for all department heads. Doris made new reporting features and the operation seemed to be OK.

The employee turn over rate was brought up, however Jay saw no problem with it and the issue was dead at this time.

The books had been balanced by putting overflow in the category of fixed assets. This problem must now be dealt with.

During the next few days it was decided to form a committee and solve the problem. Before the committee could meet, Richard’s had a discussion with his friend and decided on a package already.

Problems: Round 1

The decision on the software was actually not a decision, since there was no actual choice.

None of the supervisors had much experience with computers.

There was no training for the new system.

There are internal politics between management units.

Bob Cornish (in charge of installing new data) leaves for over three weeks, project stoppage.

Upon restarting the project, they hire a inexperienced college student.

Now, mistakes made by previous employees and temps come into the picture.

Problems: Round 2

This new college student, had little actual background, and no work experience

Upon restarting the project, coding mistakes are found which were caused by using the temps which were hired.

There was no help for Helen (new hire) and soon she made mistakes.

There were problems getting information from clerks, due to their perception of losing their jobs.

The class codings of the system had had mistakes made by upper management.

The whole project actually has a low priority to information services.

Problem Analysis.

When the business was a single entity, problems could be covered up. Now with the organization numbering hundreds of outlets, the problem has became a nightmare. When Gregg (the CEO) took over, the first thing to do was to analyze the books. If Gregg did not think about it, surely Jay (second hire) should of done it. This mistake not only filters down a organization but each time it does filter down the problem multiplies. Planning is the problem here and it reaches basically every decision made in this case study. First, the computerized system used did not match the organization needs from the beginning (used for a single company). The new system actually had no analysis made for it’s purpose. Second, errors were made from the CEO to the department heads. The new formed CEO should of did analysis on the firms accounting status when beginning. The department heads should of voiced their concerns about their lack of experience with computers to upper management.

Communications skills are not only bad, but nearly non-existent. Over and over again concerns are either passed up or simply covered by "don’t worry about, I’ll take care of it". Employee turnover looks to be a sign of communication problems but, once again, the "gate’s left open". The selection of personnel for the discussions ( which actually never took place ) were once again done on the fly without much input or analysis. Training was non-existent not only with operators but with their own department heads. ( the company deserves to fail at this time). The users were seldom asked for input and when they were, they were little passive beings.

Alternatives :

Plan 1 : Continue with implementation.

One option would be to continue. With class-coding corrected, there is a possibility of fulfillment with company objectives. Another analysis is needed to back up the above sentence. Maybe the code can be modified or other modules added. The problem is not so much a software problem as it is the internal operations of the corporate structure. Even with the continuos choice of this project, a complete analysis should be done by perhaps both an internal employee and a out-sourced consultant.

I believe that a budget of 10,000 dollars could easily be afforded by this organization and bring fresh data and information to bear for upper management.

Plan 2 : Scraping of the project.

While this may be done anyway, an analysis would be done basically to get more information and decision making data. A project does not need to be scrapped if not necessary since a stigma will exist for the personnel involved which may never be corrected. This purpose alone is why a study must be performed.

Plan 3: OutSource the project.

Do to company lack of computer knowledge, this is a viable option. The size of the company will prevent any quick fixes in the traditional ways ( a hire here and a hire there ). My first thought is that a outside team be used for 1.5 to 2 years while internally the solution of illiteracy of computers is dealt with. With little formal training of tactical management, it will have to either 1. Be brought in or

learned. Either way, training for the operational management stills needs to be done. And this is another time-scale which needs to be addressed.

Plan 4 : A combination of outsourcing and internal operation.

Perhaps internal networking could be used for each division and the corporate assimilation of information be done by outside consultants, ~ Oracle , etc… With the size of the company at hand and the responsibilities of the top management and their lack of computer usage, I believe an outside corporation specializing in information gathering be brought in. Of course there is concern of operating methods which will be made public to an outside force, however they might not have a choice in this area ( non- disclosures agreements are only partially en-forcible ).

Plan 5 : Complete new system with training and more training.

I do not know about the budget available however, with the CEO background and past work experience, along with his chief vice president I also see this as a n option. Since things are already screwed up, they could run the existing system with the new system in parallel until training and usage was up to "code". One benefit here is keeping the operation’s in house and "under wraps".

For any of these alternatives to work, I believe their attitude about lower employees will need to change (keeping their salary low and letting them move on…). It will be hard to foster young potential with this method of operation. Then again I could be wrong.

Analysis of alternatives:

Continue implementation of existing system.

Pro

Save existing money on software already purchased. Training also, although ~ nil

Save management from embarrassments of poor decision making, or lack of.

Con:

System might not be fixable and could be wrong from the beginning.

Throwing more money down a "rat hole".

Being fined by a government agency for improper bookkeeping.

Error building up until a major problem exist and is inescapable. ~ to late.

Plan 2 : Immediate scrapping of project.

Pro:

Save money and get pass the disaster which occurred.

Get on with the solution to the problem.

Get a fresh start with the "new methods" of the organization.

Con:

Inside distraught employees whose have now faced failure.

Acknowledgment of failure by upper management.

Not as much control as inside solution would offer………….see web for all.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Computer Information Systems and Case analysis studies

Strategic uses of  Information.

Background facts:

Ecologix Technologies began it’s start in the 1940’s as a grain warehousing organization. In 1979 the owner had passed away and left the firm to his brother. The brother, Myron was also of age and had no desire to take on this position. However, his son (Gregg) which had a formal education and had proved himself in business received half the stock of the company from his father, Myron. Gregg’s success was in retailing products in the supermarket arena and he had worked himself up to president. Shortly after accepting this position from his father, he purchased a controlling interest in the supermarket chain. The acquisitions had begun and in a short time, the organization had became a conglomerate with nine subsidiary units. The different divisions compliment each other except for the oil and gas company which is owned. A new executive vice president was hired (Jay) which also had a successful background and in turn he had hired his past associate (Glenn) from his banking experience. Glenn is the director of information services and faces the task of turning IS from a support division to a strategic division.

Follow up to Problems:

Glenn immediately made his presence known buy purchasing a additional main-frame computer which would increase processing capability by sixty percent and doubling personnel in the department of information services. Even with this action, the IS department had a hard time keeping up with the necessary tasks. Data entry still took the required 40 hour week and overtime was taking another 20 hour a week. Still everything was classed as OK and top management saw no problem.

The director and the managers of the different accounting departments do not have degrees in accounting and the more Jay (executive vice president) learned about the situation, the more concerned he became.

The books had never balanced, and with the rapid growth that took place, the problems had

been multiplying. Jay decided a house cleaning was in order and begun by hiring a formally trained accountant named Doris Hill. Doris’s position was chief accountant. Doris reorganized the department and made accounting training mandatory for all department heads. Doris made new reporting features and the operation seemed to be OK.

The employee turn over rate was brought up, however Jay saw no problem with it and the issue was dead at this time.

The books had been balanced by putting overflow in the category of fixed assets. This problem must now be dealt with.

During the next few days it was decided to form a committee and solve the problem. Before the committee could meet, Richard’s had a discussion with his friend and decided on a package already.

Problems: Round 1

The decision on the software was actually not a decision, since there was no actual choice.

None of the supervisors had much experience with computers.

There was no training for the new system.

There are internal politics between management units.

Bob Cornish (in charge of installing new data) leaves for over three weeks, project stoppage.

Upon restarting the project, they hire a inexperienced college student.

Now, mistakes made by previous employees and temps come into the picture.

Problems: Round 2

This new college student, had little actual background, and no work experience

Upon restarting the project, coding mistakes are found which were caused by using the temps which were hired.

There was no help for Helen (new hire) and soon she made mistakes.

There were problems getting information from clerks, due to their perception of losing their jobs.

The class codings of the system had had mistakes made by upper management.

The whole project actually has a low priority to information services.

Problem Analysis.

When the business was a single entity, problems could be covered up. Now with the organization numbering hundreds of outlets, the problem has became a nightmare. When Gregg (the CEO) took over, the first thing to do was to analyze the books. If Gregg did not think about it, surely Jay (second hire) should of done it. This mistake not only filters down a organization but each time it does filter down the problem multiplies. Planning is the problem here and it reaches basically every decision made in this case study. First, the computerized system used did not match the organization needs from the beginning (used for a single company). The new system actually had no analysis made for it’s purpose. Second, errors were made from the CEO to the department heads. The new formed CEO should of did analysis on the firms accounting status when beginning. The department heads should of voiced their concerns about their lack of experience with computers to upper management.

Communications skills are not only bad, but nearly non-existent. Over and over again concerns are either passed up or simply covered by "don’t worry about, I’ll take care of it". Employee turnover looks to be a sign of communication problems but, once again, the "gate’s left open". The selection of personnel for the discussions ( which actually never took place ) were once again done on the fly without much input or analysis. Training was non-existent not only with operators but with their own department heads. ( the company deserves to fail at this time). The users were seldom asked for input and when they were, they were little passive beings.

Computer Information Systems and Case analysis studies

Strategic uses of  Information…continued..

Alternatives :

Plan 1 : Continue with implementation.

One option would be to continue. With class-coding corrected, there is a possibility of fulfillment with company objectives. Another analysis is needed to back up the above sentence. Maybe the code can be modified or other modules added. The problem is not so much a software problem as it is the internal operations of the corporate structure. Even with the continuos choice of this project, a complete analysis should be done by perhaps both an internal employee and a out-sourced consultant.

I believe that a budget of 10,000 dollars could easily be afforded by this organization and bring fresh data and information to bear for upper management.

Plan 2 : Scraping of the project.

While this may be done anyway, an analysis would be done basically to get more information and decision making data. A project does not need to be scrapped if not necessary since a stigma will exist for the personnel involved which may never be corrected. This purpose alone is why a study must be performed.

Plan 3: OutSource the project.

Do to company lack of computer knowledge, this is a viable option. The size of the company will prevent any quick fixes in the traditional ways ( a hire here and a hire there ). My first thought is that a outside team be used for 1.5 to 2 years while internally the solution of illiteracy of computers is dealt with. With little formal training of tactical management, it will have to either 1. Be brought in or

learned. Either way, training for the operational management stills needs to be done. And this is another time-scale which needs to be addressed.

Plan 4 : A combination of outsourcing and internal operation.

Perhaps internal networking could be used for each division and the corporate assimilation of information be done by outside consultants, ~ Oracle , etc… With the size of the company at hand and the responsibilities of the top management and their lack of computer usage, I believe an outside corporation specializing in information gathering be brought in. Of course there is concern of operating methods which will be made public to an outside force, however they might not have a choice in this area ( non- disclosures agreements are only partially en-forcible ).

Plan 5 : Complete new system with training and more training.

I do not know about the budget available however, with the CEO background and past work experience, along with his chief vice president I also see this as a n option. Since things are already screwed up, they could run the existing system with the new system in parallel until training and usage was up to "code". One benefit here is keeping the operation’s in house and "under wraps".

For any of these alternatives to work, I believe their attitude about lower employees will need to change (keeping their salary low and letting them move on…). It will be hard to foster young potential with this method of operation. Then again I could be wrong.

 Analysis of alternatives:

Continue implementation of existing system.

Pro

Save existing money on software already purchased. Training also, although ~ nil

Save management from embarrassments of poor decision making, or lack of.

Con:

System might not be fixable and could be wrong from the beginning.

Throwing more money down a "rat hole".

Being fined by a government agency for improper bookkeeping.

Error building up until a major problem exist and is inescapable. ~ to late.

 Plan  : Immediate scrapping of project.

Pro:

Save money and get pass the disaster which occurred.

Get on with the solution to the problem.

Get a fresh start with the "new methods" of the organization.

Con:

Acknowledgment of failure by upper management.

Politics inside the organizations which can last forever.

 Plan 3 : OutSource the project.

Con:

Outside people knowing the inside business.

Carrying salary for the employees as well as the OutSourcers.

Not as much control as inside solution would offer. …………….see web for all

Computer Information Systems and Case analysis studies

Application Development

 

List ways that CDS has done a good job with their policy on ISM. Also list bad methods.

The company seems to have the people and the business. Operations management is handled by each division which most likely has both good points and bad. The company’s background also states that the focus was data processing and not management information systems, this is a minus. The management’s experience was with production and not information, which is a minus. The managers also worked by observation and not formal reports which I would believe you would use both, making another minus. The DSS systems were a plus with the downloading from the mainframe being a plus. The company was applying MRP and MRP-II which would include the company with other good size corporations. The modeling process ~ linear programming etc.. was a plus. The computer products division was contributing 2/3 to the total products, this needs to be looked at and technique transferred to other divisions.

2. Does CDS set a good example for its customers in terms of how it uses its own products?

First comment would be yes, they apply DSS, OAS, AIS, MRP, MRP-II, MIS, Modeling and apply this pretty much across the enterprise. Also EIS which downloads data daily from the mainframe shows me that someone in MIS has a clue~sense~brain etc…. Their computer’s use E-mail, Voice mail, Multimedia and audio applications, seems like a modern operation to me in terms of applying technology. The firm is always advancing on new ideas, and equipment.

 List Advantages of the top-down and bottom up approach, and their departments.

Organizational systems are top down to use responsibility and someone to take responsibility. The human element will often go around responsibility if it is not their idea. Managers are asked for their input or the theory is explained to them for their approval so that the goals have a better chance of reality. If everyone applied their-only ideas things would not be as structured. These strict rules are changing toward some of the Japanese techniques which ask the worker and not the CEO for input. The ideal method I believe is a combination of both inputs with communication being the method of choice. With the work group bottom up method, once again I believe the best approach is the multi-input reasoning and decision making one. If a company is going to optimize it’s resources , why not get input from the employees, are they not resources also.

 Assuming a problem, where does it exist.

With divisions acting as individual companies with their own inter systems and goals, would be my first stop for analysis with problems. Also top management who does not use computers are not setting a good example for others and actually are telling lower management that the computers are not critical or serious. This lets old stereotypes continue in there existence. Anytime developer’s design systems without feedback and desires by management it is only a manner of time before failure occurs. The marketing system failure was attributed directly to this. I believe this failure was a throw-in by the authors since other information in the case tells me this would not of occurred. Anyway this problem stood out like a sore thumb, ~ lacking input from the actual users. Also managers might not know what they want and internal operations should verify the knowledge level of these entities ~ managers. The Input screen development was important, but what about the output screen, is this not the bottom line?

 Was Sterns right that MKIS was more of a DSS than a MIS ? explain

Yes, MIS reports are not always as specific as a DSS report is. DSS reports are a sub-topic of MIS. MIS applies across the board to all divisions today while DSS are still filtering into some divisions tomorrow. The optimal situation will be a combination of the two across the organization. Perhaps a DSS will download data from a MIS report and apply that data for a more specific work group application. Much like a executive information system works in this case. MIS covers structured questions while DSS work more with semi-structured ones.

 List the personnel involved in the failure of the marketing system.

John Sterns was the easiest person to blame. When in reality it was every one else.

Gene Washington, Alton Fox, Research Personnel.

There was one area I believe that john acted deviate in and that was making the development have a bottom up design which got around administration review procedures. That said, the other people listed above should of caught such an elementary mistake as not getting user input. I am going to put blame on all parties involved, with any disciple actions occurring to John first for the fact that he knew and on purpose went around built-in checking tasks of the organization.

 What should of happened in above question.

What would I do to fix the problem.

First , no information system is created unless all top management is aware as well as a committee formed to oversee the need and the development of the information system. People like John are assets to the company , however like any complicated combinations such as business and humans, check features must be put into place and operated.

See WEB site for all………………

 

 

 

Computer Information Systems and Case analysis studies

Intranets

 

Do the facts indicate that Liu did an adequate research job before he purchased the system. 

No, first mistake was to receive no input from the actual users which will make actual success a real possibility.

Second, (although not completely his direct fault) was assigning a human with to much to do in other operations the additional opportunity of system analysis ( or additional burden ) and expecting a correct analysis.

Third, actual selection of four choices (with half of them automatically being voted against) is not actually a choice, but a rather simple decision.

Forth, any intelligence "unit administrator" who believes that two days of training is all that is required for any software program, is not intelligence at all and should have such a position in any application.

How should Liu gain the users support, since he did not get their input on the system or the vendors.

By not getting their input at the beginning, the task of receiving trust from the users is twice (or more) as hard to accomplish.

It is not impossible however, and outside input is always available and should be done. I believe this is the first step in getting trust. Being present "in the trenches" is also a positive in the eyes of the "warriors". Whenever a leader does not care to be in trenches, the complete trust of the "warriors" will only fade, unless the countries propaganda is damn good. ~ German propaganda leader ~ Mr. Groubells 1933-1945. Name is not spelled correctly.

He should receive input by: Face to Face input, unnamed input by surveys or other methods which will receive the same desired information. Any means of completion of this task is justified and must be done.

Who should determine what reports the system will deliver and when should that decision be made.

The managers must have some say in the conclusion or will not take responsibility for decisions made completely by other people, or at least not take these decisions in the "optimal way" toward the success of the firms strategic goals.

One actual method which is done daily in retail management is the acceptance of corporate goals and the tasks which must be done. Corporate management lets store manager set some of their own methods toward completion and therefore the store manager must take responsibility, since the store manager partially set the rules. This way failure is easily set on a name if failure actually does occur. ~ like Office Depot.

The decisions should be made before actual choices for system analysis is done. After all this is the reason for the new system and slacking here will one major reason if project is a failure.

What can Liu do in the sale of the new system applying "internal marketing", and who he must sell this system to and list his alternatives.

Lets do part b first since the answer is shortest. 1.b He needs to sell the system to 1. The management, 2. The users. The more he can sell it , the more possible the success of it. If the system analysis is aware of their responsibilities, they will realize this is a prime concern and has to be dealt with for successful implementation.

1.a Internal marketing most likely consist of several application.

Pointing out the main problems of the firm in present time.

State how computers can be applied to solve these problem.

Address the employees concerns in both the business and their personal desires in their careers.

State some numbers in the actual "net increase" of the savings involved and address the benefits that the employees will gain upon the successful implement of the project (~ appox~ 1 year). I do not care what any "expert" will say, money will still give excellent motivation.

The drawbacks must also be stated for early frustration to be avoided.

Examples, additional burden , which will need to be done at the same time of everyday operations.

A new way of operations, a new vocabulary, all at the same time as day to day work.

This is way compensation either direct or indirect is required, if you lose the users motivation, failure will most likely have a very fair chance of occurring.

His only real alternatives are the methods he uses to complete the above points.

~ Bring in additional training by instructors, by training packages, maybe a internal sponsor will do the training themselves..

All points above, 1-5 must be dealt with ( most likely additional ones also)

with the alternatives being
1. Who will do it.

How to do it.

How long to do it.

Including personnel , accounting, operation with both divisions of the organization.

 

………See my Web for all.

 

 

Computer Information Systems and Case analysis studies

Manage Change , Campus Bookstore

 Access to information can be hindered by a firms procedures or by misinterpretation.

What would you do to correct the situation in this case where a clerk denied the bookstores request for an account ?

Exceptions by senior administrators should always be viewed at. I would try to correct the problem by writing a memo to all staff and faculty that would "educate them" in the correct procedures for "changing things". I would explain to them who the senior administrators are and document the phone numbers and E-mail addresses. The complete University needs to have a meeting in "whole" since the attitude of everyone (over 51%) is not rational when it comes to communications. There are communication problems from different operations and divisions. Every few months or as often as needed, an actual face to face meeting needs to occur across different entities. My preference is the meetings since as an instructor you know that manuals are not the "best bet". As a supplement, the manual is better and probably required. As the conclusion of the case admits, it was a communication problem, once again. One last point, the players here seemed to have several obligations.

 Many areas of an organization may rely upon a single information system.

How would you insure that all areas affected by an information system are represented in the design and use of it.

The only way to optimize the "system" is for everyone’s desires and concerns to be involved from the very beginning. System development using several divisions can be a considerable undertaking. It is most likely that a single or pair of individuals are not able to cover needs without something being overlooked. As a project manager on such a task I would get "project sponsors" from each department. I would interview as many as possible to see exactly what I was working with. Face to face, mail-ins, meetings, as much communication at the beginning as possible. This could then be narrowed down to a manageable level. These "department sponsors" would carry the torch and hopefully let me work at the upper level. These sponsors could possibly train and grow into the new operation, making both the firm and themselves more valuable.

The publishers software estimates how many books are needed.

Should a manager be allowed to modify or ignore this, explain. 

If this software is an algorithm and it comes from the publisher, I have a problem with that.

Yes the manager can override defaults, no generic algorithm can correctly decide anything for all situations. I believe they are on the right track however. I believe that an expert system is called upon here with the expertise of local operators. This would allow local variations which the publishers system probably does not employ. At the least it would give a second opinion and allow inside expertise. Since "Business Schools" are looked on as leaders, it is pertinent that they employ what they teach. This adjustment period could last a few years if necessary and under certain situations.

Helen was able to calculate the cost of over ordering of books.

How do put a cost on under ordering ?

Anxiety to all entities involved will be the price here. The student, instructors, book store employees will all get bad attitudes and end up like this case begun. As usual it took a women to help figure out the actual problem (ha ha) . This bad attitude will cost thousands in lost productivity in the long run. Not including the aging factor. I imagine that this factor (bad attitudes) can bankrupt a corporation. The corporation which has great leadership and excellent morale will surely finds itself among the top. One requires the other for optimal ability.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Computer Information Systems and Case analysis studies

 

CASE : Midwest Farm Supplies   A Corporate View..........

1a. Describe computer literacy.

 Computer literacy is the ability to speak and understand the general " glossary of terms" in the computer "arena". Actual "engineering" of a system is not needed as is memorization of the vocabulary. Computer literacy is like television literacy, you can know the actors and plots, but you have no idea of the methods which actual integrate the two together. Literacy can be accomplished in a small amount of time when compared with implementation, operation, and re-configuring of the peripherals. ~ understanding how things work.

 1b. Why does a firm need personnel which are proficient in the use of information technology.

Covered somewhat in above paragraph with the following additions. Proficient means to me that the person or organization is taking a proactive stance on information technology. These organizations will be better suited to fend off competition and loss of market share. The company’s growth has a better chance of success if the upper management takes a proactive stance. Information gathering and usage of is changing almost on a monthly basis. A proactive attitude is what strategy management is about and without (proactive attitude) a company is only waiting to lose market share. It is also better for the employee to be "smart" in case they need to find a new job.

How has the power of PC’s help make client-server possible?

In a word, technology. When IBM did not enforce their patents on the original PC, a complete market was formed and ever since the technology has doubled every three years. Price was an after effect of "cloning" by letting many companies produce components and software for the PC. Within ten years there were tens of millions of PC’s and the market has evolved into what it is today. Each computer now has the power of the mainframe which existed ten years ago. Dumb-Terminals have been replaced with "processing units" which can internally operate and only need the mainframe for storing and distributing only the largest amounts of information. Mainframes still provide the "gathering of data" for management strategic operatives, inventories and security.

How is the sales rep’s knowledge important to the development of an expert system. Use case examples.

The sales rep is the "show piece" of an organization (to the customer). The customer will base their decision most likely on the "form" of the sales-person. Nobody personally knows the customer like the sales-rep and remember the old saying that "nothing happens until the sale". The sales-person knows the education of the buyer as well as the cultural aspects of them. The sales-rep knows the terrain better and by seeing the customer’s operation he can become a part of the system. This possessed information must be used otherwise it is a wasted resource. The actual system analyst cannot "feed the bulldog" ~ optimize the organization’s resources without this input.

 Use the sales ordering system to justify either a distributed database or a client-server one for this case.

I believe a distributed database which is updated on a nightly basis. Much like a large retailer of products would have. If something would happen at a single office or the corporate headquarters it would not shut down immediate operations of the "branches" and when brought online be updated to the latest information. In the state that has modern equipment this will be easier than the older equipment which does still exist. With hardware prices as there are (DELL offers a 200 MHz complete system for $2000) , I see little reason not to update the equipment where necessary. Then again, I could be completely wrong.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Computer Information Systems and Case analysis studies

 

Information System Planning

 

 How has the Internet changed the way information intensive organizations operate ?

Interaction with gathering methods (the Internet) has supplemented the "static methods" of yesterday (library cards). One of the main problems today is not the gathering of information but the deciphering of it. Competition will require concerned organizations to fabricate their own method of operations applying this medium (Internet). Data must be changed into information at a ever increasing rate of speed. Information is now gathered and sorted by companies which work "around the clock" (at least the computers do). Global applications can now occur which would of been impossible only a few years ago. The Internet also "gives" organizations new ideas for all facets of operation from management to marketing. The Internet allows companies to "view" into competitors strategies and adjust their own "mission plan" for optimality. The Internet is evolving so fast that all of it’s potential will not be known for some time, if ever. With voice, video, sound, and text all becoming "engineered" into the "NET" the list of applications is limited only by the strategist and their planners. While several types of businesses will "survive" without the "NET", information intensive organizations are not one of them. The Internet is a catalyst for "brain-storming".

Risks and Benefits of allowing outside entities to access Company information.

Benefits of allowing outside inquires include new customer awareness and increased sales. Outside solicitors which number in the many would also become familiar with the organization. Suppliers would be an example as well as towns and cities looking for relocating your firm to a more desired area of the country. Global presence is now possible with the smallest firm. New applications of this "marketing technique" is growing businesses daily.

Risks include direct assault by the competition with the information furnished by the company. A competitor is able to take ideas from the company (from the new source of information, the Internet) and improve on it and the original company must then improve once more creating a "leap frogging" of one company over the other, which at this time sees no end. Intruders for fun and desire can destroy and-or corrupt data of the company. Perhaps the resources required for these operations (home page, maintenance, etc.…) could also be considered a risk (wasted moneys and resources). New liabilities will occur for firms, limited only by the imagination of attorneys and judges.

Unfair business practices, prejudices, and fraud are sure to multiply with this new "engine of business".

Why should you replace working computer equipment, even if still functioning ?

Today’s operating systems and information requirements require speed and storage not available optimally only a couple years ago. Software applications drive develop of the hardware and without the software the computer itself actually becomes a liability (taking resources). With hardware and software prices going down as fast as the speed and storage is increasing, only an idiot would argue to keep computer equipment running until failure. I must also note that the competition already knows this and will overtake the "idiot’s" company. Like a capital-intensive manufacturing company which "lives by it’s machinery", an information-processing company must continually monitor it’s status on the "machinery" and update as often as the company believes is necessary to keep the "edge". The older equipment can be moved into a "print server" position or other area which is not "mission critical". Hey , donate it to the schools.

Why will Databases on the Internet change the way Marketing works ?

A knowledgeable organization can now gather, sort and output data around the clock. Databases on customers, products, buying patterns, geographical information all allow for getting information at basically "the speed of light".

The Internet allows this around the clock information and some forms of information is almost free. Marketing can not only find new markets but contact existing customers of other companies and "steal them" with superior products and services. Databases on CD-ROM’s can be applied with Internet databases for perhaps a more optimal environment. The old saying that nothing happens until the "SALE" is even more a burden or opportunity for the marketing phase to apply this new "tool"(Internet). Once again the competition will not sit back, and innovation for a company is becoming essential not only in development but also all phases of an organization. New market development which would take likely two to five years with yesterday’s operations must be able to find new markets is as little time as perhaps ninety days. In the development climate of today it would not surprise me if companies are finding new markets, products and techniques "on the fly".

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Computer Information Systems and Information System Management overview

 

Solution of a Case Problem

The Case Solution Process

Defining the Solution

Problems both good and bad.

You do not have to know everything

Think of yourself as a consultant

Give yourself enough time

The Hierarchy of Problem Areas

Location of problems in the system

Use of Case solution Forms

System Levels

Sequence of System Part Analysis

Hints in Defining The Problem

Problems and not symptoms

Most roads lead to the Manager

To many problems

Evaluating the Solutions

Choice of Alternatives

Achieving the Solution

Presenting the Solution

Chap 2

Documentation of a Case Problem Solution

Preparation of the Report 1. Write the Rough Draft

Refine the Rough Draft

Type the Report

ProofRead the Typed Report.

Suggested Report Format

Report Heading

Report Sections

Summary of Important Facts

Problem

Logical Integration

Decision

Analysis

Conclusion

Report Length

Sample Case Problem

Form 1 The Problem Setting

Form 2 The Firm

Form 3 The Firms Subsystems

Form 4 Symptoms and Problems

Form 5 Solution Alternatives

Form 6 The Decision and its Implementation

Chap 5 A Sample Solution

Summary of Important Facts

Problem

Decision

Analysis

Alternative 1 Advantages

Disadvantage

Alternative 2 Advantages

Disadvantages

Alternative 3 Advantages

 

Marketing plans and terms.          Lance lawson

Section 1 of 7 03/30/96 22:20:0

I. Executive Summary

A. Marketing Plan Overview

1. Key Points of Marketing Plan

Section 2 of 7 03/30/96 22:21:29

II. Situation Analysis

A. Business and Product/Service Description

1. Describe the Industry

Section 3 of 7 03/30/96 22:21:47

III. Marketing Plan Objectives

A. Organizational Mission and Goals/Objectives

1. Specify the Organizational Mission and Objectives

Section 4 of 7 03/30/96 22:22:11

IV. Market Selection: Target Markets

A. Strategy - Product Positioning

1. Specify Product Position for Marketing Objective

Section 5 of 7 03/30/96 22:22:2

V. Marketing Strategy & Marketing Mix

A. Strategy - Product/Service

1. Determine Current Product Fit Per Segment

Section 6 of 7 03/30/96 22:22:42

VI. Action Program

A. Product

1. Write Tactical Product Objective

Section 7 of 7 03/30/96 22:23:00

VII. Budget, Control and Accountability

Marketing plans and terms. cont…         Lance lawson

A. Operational Budgets

1. Prepare an Operational Budget

 1. Summarize and highlight the key points of the marketing plan.

2. Summarize the relationship between the organization's mission

and the objectives and strategies of the marketing plan.

 Updated 03/30/96 22:29:05 ( Created 03/30/96 22:29:05 )

Section 2, Heading 1, Question 1

 1. Briefly describe the basic industry within which the

organization exists. The U.S. Industrial Outlook, published

by the U.S. Department of Commerce, will provide you with

sufficient information to describe the industry by Division,

Major Group, Industry Group, and Industry. In addition, it

will provide you with excellent product/service forecast

information for the coming year.

Section 2, Heading 1, Question 2

 2. Briefly describe the business of the organization and

how it fits within the industry.

Section 2, Heading 1, Question 3

 3. Briefly describe the product or service that will be

addressed in this marketing plan and explain how it fits

within the business of the organization.

 Section 2, Heading 2, Question 1

 1. What is the market potential for this type of product/service

in terms of sales dollars and volume of units/utilization?

SEE WEB SITE FOR ALL.

Some Engineering Lingo

Some FEA terms , 

Beam
A slender structural member that offers resistance to forces and bending under applied loads. Beams are found in building frames, transmission towers, bridges. The Eiffel Tower in Paris is made of beams.
Bending Load
A bending load causes an object to curve. For example a diving board will develop a pronounced curve if a person stands on one end. Note that the other end is solidly fixed so that it cannot pivot.
Boundary Element
A type of finite element sometimes used to connect the finite element model to fixed points in space. Typically this fixity is set with global boundary conditions, in which the fixity is totally rigid. A boundary element, on the other hand, allows for a flexible connection to the fixed space.
Buckling Analysis
If you press down on an empty soft drink can with your hand, not much will seem to happen. If you put the can on the floor and gradually increase the force by stepping down on it with your foot, at some point it will suddenly squash. This sudden scrunching is known as "buckling."
Composite Material
Composite materials consist of two or more independent materials. Many composite materials contain a large amount of one substance combined with fibers, flakes or layers of another. Greater strength is obtained than what the individual materials acting alone can achieve.
Composite Elements for finite element analysis
The use of composite materials in industry led to develop special composite finite elements for stress and vibration analysis of parts made of composite materials. employs special element formulations for this purpose.
What is an Element (in Finite Element Analysis)?
An element is the basic building block of finite element analysis. There are several basic types of elements. Which type is used depends on the type of object that is to be modeled for finite element analysis.
What is Finite Element Analysis (FEA)?
Finite Element Analysis is a computerized method for predicting how a real world object will react to forces, heat, vibration, etc. in terms of whether it will break, not wear out or work the way it is supposed to. It is called "analysis", but in the product design cycle it is used to predict what is going to happen when the product is used.
Finite Element Theory Made Easy
In 1678, Robert Hooke set down the basis for modern finite element stress analysis as Hooke's Law. Simply, an elastic body stretches (strain) in proportion to the force (stress) on it." Mathematically:
F=kx.
•F = force •k = proportional constant •x = distance of stretching
This is the only equation you need to know to understand finite element stress analysis. Hooke proved it out by using weights to stretch wires hanging from the ceiling. This experiment is repeated every year in virtually every high school laboratory by students who study physics.
 Frequency Response
Suppose an electric motor is to drive a conveyer system to move grain from the storage area to the area where it will be processed into Cheerios.
 

Engineering Lingo Continued..

Buckling Analysis
I
f you press down on an empty soft drink can with your hand, not much will seem to happen. If you put the can on the floor and gradually increase the force by stepping down on it with your foot, at some point it will suddenly squash. This sudden scrunching is known as "buckling."
Frequency Response
Suppose an electric motor is to drive a conveyer system to move grain from the storage area to the area where it will be processed into Cheerios.
When the motor is switched on, the system starts up, going through a number of transient conditions, possibly with occasional rumbling and buzzing, finally reaching a steady-state condition for smooth, normal operation. Analyzing the parts of the conveyer system throughout this time and during the final running state can be done with Transient Vibration Analysis. But this type of analysis may provide much more information than is actually needed if the engineers only want to study the normal running operation. Further, defining the input information to include the final condition would involve a large amount of data.
Random Vibration
Engineers use this type of analysis to find out how a device or structure responds to steady shaking of the kind you would feel riding in a truck, rail car, rocket (when the motor is on), and so on. Also, things that are riding in the vehicle, such as on-board electronics or cargo of any kind, may need Random Vibration Analysis.
Response Spectrum Analysis
Engineers use this type of analysis to find out how a device or structure responds to sudden forces or shocks. It is assumed that these shocks or forces occur at boundary points which are normally fixed.
An example would be a building, dam or nuclear reactor when an earthquake strikes. During an earthquake, violent shaking occurs. This shaking transmits into the structure or device at the points where they are attached to the ground (boundary points).
Transient Vibration Analysis
When you strike a guitar string or a tuning fork, it goes from a state of inactivity into a vibration to make a musical tone. This tone seems loudest at first, then gradually dies out. Conditions are changing from the first moment the note is struck.
When an electric motor is started up, it eventually reaches a steady state of operation. But to get there, it starts from zero rpm and passes through an infinite number of speeds until it attains the operating speed.
Vibration Analysis (Modal Analysis)
All things vibrate. Think of musical instruments, think of riding in a car, think of the tires being out of balance, think of the rattles in an airplane when they are revving up the engines, or the vibration under your feet when a train goes by.
Sometimes vibration is good. Our ears enable us to hear because they respond to the vibrations of sound waves.
Many times things are made to vibrate for a purpose. For example, a special shaking device is used in foundries to loosen a mold placed in sand. Or, in the food and bulk materials industries, conveyors frequently work by vibration.
See WEB for all…..
 

 

Mechanical appications sourcing on Internet and AutoCAD accessories.

 

Some mechanical points of interest and AutoCad. Good luck and let me know !! AutoCad below. PGDN it.

 

Boilers (34)

Humidifiers (2)

Refrigeration (25)

 

 

Consulting (40)

Drafting and Illustration (12)

Employment (1)

numbers are vendors available for product.

 

Product Design (45)

Rapid Prototyping@

Robotics (80)

Software (22)

AutoCad points of interest and necessity.

Autograph Technical Services - offering CadCARD Slidechart reference tool for AutoCAD.

Bolder Designs - specializes in networks for CAD users.

Caddtech

CADOnLine - offers news, tips, reviews, tutorials, AutoLISP code, and more.

Cadre Systems Inc. - management tools (software) for Autocad users, Autolisp programs and administration advice.

CADSYM - Electrical and fluid power symbol libraries for use with AutoCAD and AutoCAD LT.

CADsyst - AutoCAD shareware, freeware and public domain utilities and files.

D.C. CADD

DotSoft - autoCAD-based geology management software for the mining industry.

Eclipse Software - Makers of Facade, a 3D modeling software. Samples of Autocad DWG files and VRML models.

EMT Software, Inc. - offering mechanical design applications for AutoCAD R13 and R14. Also offers a mechanical design add-on for SolidWorks.

Engineering Site - solutions for the budget conscience architectural, engineering and design firm featuring Hewlett Packard CAD equipment and very unique CAD software.

I.S.T. Software Developers - AutoFILL and AutoFONTS, plotting utility software.

Inkbox Co., The - provides utility programs that work with AutoCAD.

Ketiv Technologies, Inc. - developer of ArchT, an architectural plug-in for AutoCAD. Graphics tools including blocks & textures, just textures for architectural and web page design.

LISP Generator 3 - the automatic program writer for AutoCAD

MCG Sofware - Creators of Layer Express and Layer Translator, layer management software solutions for AutoCAD.

Meier Associates Engineering Services - engineering firm.

Microcon - provides AutoCAD and MicroStation products and certified training for the CAD community of engineers and architects.

New Riders Publishing - Publishers of tutorials on Autodesk products, concentrating on AutoCAD and 3D Studio

Off Broadway Business Systems - to provide business, government, and education with productivity tools shaped from emerging technologies

Peri-Tech Drafting Service - For AutoCad piping and structural steel software add-ons.

POLLVX Design - facilities management software using your AutoCAD layouts, and macros on demand.

SimpleCAD - AutoLISP program to manage AutoCAD blocks and AutoLISP routines.

SEE WEB SITE for MORE and Links to all of these places.

 

Industrial appications sourcing on Internet, in word this file would have live links to internet locations.

 


numbers are supplies which offer product.

Industrial appications sourcing on Internet  cont…

 

SEE WEB Site for complete list and where all links are LIVE!!!

 

Engineering CMMS Terms.

CMMS

Computerized Maintenance Management System

 Glossary

 Word or Term Meaning or Definition Within this Publication

Ad-hoc Reporting         The ability to develop report formats not standard to the CMMS, but using data accumulated by the CMMS.

Application Program     Software having a specific usage (eg. accounting program)

ASCII Code    American Standard Code for Information Interchange. A standard for computer software file structure.

Bar Code         A means for designating (coding) alphabetic characters or numbers by a series of lines of varying width (bars) to be read by an optical scanner.

Browse Function          A software function for scanning a database to view a specific set of data field for all data records.

CAD    Computer-Aided Design.

CMMS            Computerized Maintenance Management System. A set of software that performs functions in support of the management of maintenance operations.

Corrective/Improvement Work Orders Single-job work orders describing work and resources needed for one time correction of a problem, or for making a specific improvement.

Customized Report Generator   Custom software which allows creation of a report from any set of data selected from a database.

Data Entry Validation    Automatic checking of specific characteristics of entered data to assure it is within required standards.

Data Record     A single set of the data in a database (eg. a single work order within the work order database).

DBMS Database Management System. Specialized programming for managing data.

Diagnostic Test Collecting equipment performance data through sensors and evaluating the data to indicate equipment condition.

Disaster recovery          Assistance by the supplier in restoring lost data or system files.

Downloading    Copying.

Downtime         The period during which production is halted due to equipment unavailability.

Format A specific on-screen or printed arrangement of data (eg. a Work Order form).

Function           Any activity performed by software (eg. in a CMMS, the checking of parts availability or re-scheduling of preventive maintenance work).

Generic database          Database compiled of information on many examples of the equipment type regardless of manufacturer.

Generic Equipment Repair       

History Database          A database covering a range of equipment items and containing combined historic data on many examples of each make and model.

Graphic Display/ Drawing         A pictorial display of an object or arrangement of events.

Hardware         The computers, printers, and other devices on which software programs run.

Just-in-Time (JIT)         An ordering, shipping and inventorying technique for supplying materials immediately before they are to be used.

Maintenance Procedures Library           A set of descriptions of the standard job steps and resources needed for performing specific maintenance jobs.

Management     Corporate Management not directly involved in CMMSapplications.

Menu Driven    User choices are made from on-screen lists of options.

Module            Discrete segments of software performing one or more specific functions; may be added or removed at user discretion with most CMMS.

Engineering CMMS Terms. cont…

 

MRPII Manufacturing Resource Planning.

Multi-tasking    Capability to perform two or more simultaneous software operations.

Network          See PC-LAN.

On-Line Query Direct access to information in the database while the CMMS is in operation.

Password Security        Prevention from entering and using a software system unless a valid password is entered. This may include selective restriction of the use of the system's various operating sections.

PC-LAN          Two or more PC's and/or terminals interconnected, via a local area network, so as to use the same programs and databases.

PdM    See Predictive Maintenance.

Peripheral System         A set of software and/or devices for sensing/measuring/monitoring various electrical/mechanical characteristics of equipment, interpreting the measurements and supplying the results to a CMMS to indicate the level and type of need for performing maintenance work(see Predictive Maintenance).

Pick List           A list of stockroom shelf items to be collected for use in performing a maintenance work order.

Planning            Describing the job steps and resources, such as labor, parts, support, equipment, etc. required for a work order.

PM      See Preventive Maintenance.

Preventive Maintenance            Rigidly scheduled pre-defined sets of maintenance tasks performed to counteract known sources of potential equipment failure.

Product R&D   Efforts solely directed at finding and developing new or improved products.

Remote Diagnostic        Analysis of diagnostic test data at a location distant from a sensing device.

Report Generator         See Customized Report Generator.

Scheduling        Fixing the data and time for performing a maintenance job, having assured the availability of the resources described in the planning process.

Sensor  A device whose measurement of heat, vibration, electrical or other physical characteristics will be used as input for data for predictive maintenance.

Service Bureau A company using its own software and databases to perform CMMS functions for a client on a contract basis.

Service Contract           A contract with an outside supplier of a regularly provided maintenance service, such as fork-lift truck maintenance.

Software          The programs and databases that run on computer hardware.

Source Code    Programs in their original programming language.

Standing Work Order   A work order that remains open to receive and accumulate small maintenance jobs.

System See CMMS.

User determined configuration   User determined data terminology.

Validation         See Data Entry Validation.

 

 

 

 

 

See WEB for more data.

 

 

 

 


Vocational school planning and prioritizing. cut down for space and modified.

 

 

 

 

 

Vocational school planning and prioritizing continued… cut down for space and modified.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

360 hour day by day topics in computer course. Cut-down for space.

EEK 1 Basics

WEEK 1 Basics

WEEK 1 Basics

WEEK 1 Basics

WEEK 1 Basics

Computer and Devices:

Mouse, Monitor, CPU, Printers, Operating System, Application S/W,

Windows and their Elements. Use of Win98,Word,Excel,Access.

PowerPoint. ShutDOWN, monitor to. Internet Explorer Integration w/ OFFICE Pro and Windows 98.

Windows 98 / 95 / Office basics. Office purpose, mouse, Office shortcut bar. templates. scrollbar,screen elements, toolbars. PAINT: Learn how to use mouse. Open-close menus,move windows.

Windows 98 / 95. Menus,dialog boxes,shortcuts. menus, right click,keyboard.

keys,help,zoom,web features. Default Settings. Viruses.

Work Disk (s) for Lecture Work Hand-Out.

Formatting - Copying a Disk.

Windows 98 / 95 – Explorer. Use of multiple documents.

Cut-Paste across them.

File Mgmt,Windows Explorer, Folders(creating-deleting) naming.

 

 

Windows 98 / 95 - Explorer. Programs,Taskbar.

Desktop,Active Desktop,

Internet Explorer,Recycle Bin.

Find,DOS prompt,File names.

 

Week 2 Word.

Week 2 Word.

Week 2 Word.

Week 2 Word.

Week 2 Word.

Word Applications. Letters, memos,reports,linking. Elements, View,show-hide,save. Save-as,naming 255 char.,wrap.  Undo. MACROS. Different Views. Internet Focus With Office 2000.

Explain "Objects".

WEB SITE APPLICATIONS.

Exercises 1-8.

Insertion point,spell-grammer, Thesaurus,Autocorrect,select text. Autotext,cap lock,toggle.Letter. formats(block,modified)clock.

Tabs,print preview,shrink2Fit.

Full screen,change case.Envelopes,

Labels,Email,attach,receive Email.

Exercises 9-17.

Proof-reader marks,insert,edit. Overtype,Save with other name. Read only,Document Properties. Undo,Redo.Move block of text w/Drag & Drop.Clipboard-12 times. Internet basics=modem,WWW

Internet basics=modem,WWW

HTML,web view,Save as HTML.

Exercises 18-27.

Align Text,Fonts & Sizes.Underline.

Font Colors,Format Painter.

Symbols,Bullets,Numbering

Sort,line-Paragraph spacing,

Document margins,Gutters.

Section Breaks. Hyperlinks=.

Create-Edit,Web Templates,

Backgrounds,Themes.Home Pg.

Exercises 28-35.

Tables=create,enhance,sort in,

Autoformat,Structure,

Cells. Columns,Rows,Gridlines,

Borders. Table cell alignment, table. properties,Table-Border. Toolbar. Draw Tables, corner resize. Merge-split cells.Simple calculations.

Spreadsheet,Functions,fields. Sorts.

Number formats,Borders-Shading.

Merge Doc, Main Doc,Source Doc.


Job Searching on the Internet

Nationwide U.S.

JobWeb The most comprehensive job search/career planning site on the Internet. Owned and operated by the National Association of Colleges and Employers, a not-for-profit professional association.

4WORK Current career openings listed by Fortune 5000 corporate clients, searchable by State, Company and Position.

Adams JobBank The site of Adams Media Corporation, publisher of the JobBank books (e.g. Boston JobBank, Atlanta JobBank).

America's Job Bank Links to 2,000 state Employment Service offices. It provides job seekers with a pool of active job opportunities available all over the country. Contact information is not provided, only a job number. Job seekers are required to bring the job number to a state employment agency in order to apply for positions.

Business Software Alliance This site offers an employment index with links to job opportunities in technical and nontechnical disciplines; it also provides job-search materials.

CareerBuilder This site provides links to participating employers and to job postings. Job seekers can search the job posting data base by a variety of criteria, including location and salary range.

CareerCity Jobs Job listings for professional, technical, and managerial positions; newsgroup job listings; and corporate recruiting links.

Career Magazine An online publication about jobs, employment, and careers.

CareerMosaic

CareerPath This site features a data base combining the help wanted listings from 21 newspapers in 19 major cities.

CareerSite This free site has a variety of national and international job listings from Fortune 50 companies to small/midsize companies, as well as an association with over 100 newspapers in the Northeast that list all their classified want ads on the site.

CareerWEB Jobs, employment, and careers.

The Catapult Housed on JobWeb and operated by the National Association of Colleges and Employers, this collaborative effort offers significant resources and links for graduating students, college career services professionals, and HR/staffing professionals.

College Grad Job Hunter This site provides job-search information.

Direct Marketing World's Job Center Provides space for employers to post job openings and for job applicants to post resumes.

E-SPAN Employment site. Also includes career and job-search information.

High Technology Career Magazine

Intellimatch This site offers a searchable data base of job opportunities for job hunters and resumes of job seekers for employers. Job seekers use a special resume form to join the free data base.

Job Vacancies Outside of Academe This is a direct link to a part of the site of the Chronicle of Higher Education.

JobBankUSA

JobCenter JobCenter offers online entry of resumes from job seekers or job ads from recruiters. Online searching and updating is also supported. All jobs ads and resumes are automatically distributed to USENET newsfeeds on a weekly basis.

JobNet Maintained by West Georgia College, this is a collection of job-related resources on the Internet.

JOBTRAK An online computer network comprised of job listings, company profiles and student/alumni resumes. Access to job postings is limited to colleges who have enrolled in the service.

Main Quad Resume Drop This site allows students to send their resumes directly to 150+ companies.

MedSearch America

Monster Jobs on the Web

Job Searching on the Internet cont…

 

NationJob Online Jobs Database Listings from around the United States.

Online Career Center A not-for-profit organization that handles employment advertising for human resource management. Postings are searchable by location, job title, keyword, and company name.

Purdue University - Internet Sites for Job Seekers and Employers A meta-site of job search and career-related links.

Recruiting-Links.com Primarily a site that links to recruiters' job/career information on other sites to help the recruiters build traffic to their listings.

The Riley Guide Employment Opportunities and Job Resources on the Internet

Saludos Web: National Job Listings

Space Jobs Employment opportunities in the space industry worldwide. Free to job seekers, this service provides online search capabilities and the ability to receive postings by e-mail.

StudentCenter This site offers a data base of 35,000 companies plus career planning and job-search information and tips.

Teach for America - WWW home of the national teacher corps.

TOPjobs USA Listings for professional, managerial, and technical jobs.

International Job Listings

JobWeb Jobs and Career Opportunities JobWeb provides you with access to a variety of data bases; use the keyword search capability to narrow your search to international opportunities.

Asia-Net This site is a clearinghouse for Asia-related jobs.

Calcutta Online This site provides job opening and resume information for jobs in India and the United States as well as elsewhere.

Career China Maintained by GlobalVillager, this provides job opening and job wanted information related to China, Taiwan, Hong Kong, and the Pacific Rim.

Central Services Unit The home page for the organization that aids students in the UK with career planning and employment.

Cumbria Careers Ltd. Information about and resources for employment in Cumbria.

Employment Australia

Hong Kong Jobs Job opportunities in Hong Kong.

ICEN (International Career Employment Network) An international network maintained by Indiana University.

Information Technology Institute Technical positions in Singapore.

International Civil Service Commission The home page for the International Civil Service Commission of the United Nations. The site includes employment information, including salary/benefit data, and job vacancies within the ICSC.

The Irish Jobs Vacancies Page

Job Links Links to job sites in Europe and around the world.

JobServe This site includes information on IT jobs in the UK.

Opportunities with the United Nations The site for the Office of Human Resources Management for the United Nations, New York.

Overseas Jobs This site features links to employment resources in more than 40 countries.

Physics World Jobs Institute of Physics Publishing.

Prosper Wales A data base of employer details, current vacancies, and placement schemes in Wales. This system contains details of more than 5,000 employers in Wales and may be searched according to location, core business, or selected job type.

Partial List

SEE WEB SITE where all Links are present and LIVE!!!

MBA MARKET PLAN LANCE LEE LAWSON

WILLIAM A. COHEN
The marketing plan mystique.

 The marketing plan is essential for every business operation.

 What the plan will do for the organization.

 Act as a road map.

 Assist in mgmt control and implementing strategy.

 Inform new people of their role and teaching your objectives.

 Assist in obtaining resources for implementation.

 Stimulate thinking and the better use of resources.

 Help the organization assign responsibility, tasks and timing.

 Help you become aware of problems, opportunities, and threats of the future.

 Getting in a competitive position before you start.

 Types of marketing plans.

The new product plan.

Annual meeting plans.

Summary.

Chapter 2

Planning the developing of the mkt. plan.

The structure of the plan.

The executive summary.

The table of contents.

Introduction.

Situational Analysis

Situation environment.

Neutral Environment.

Competitor environment.

Company environment.

The target market.

Problems and opportunities.

Marketing goals and objectives.

Marketing Strategy.

Marketing tactics.

Implementation and control.

THE Summary.

Keeping your material organized.

Summary.

STEP TWO………SCANNING YOUR ENVIRONMENT.

The introduction.

The situation analysis

The Target market.

Cultural, ethic, religious and racial groups.

Social Classes.

Reference Groups.

 Demographics.

 Family work status and occupations.

 Decision makers and purchasing agents.

 Risk perception.

 Income from each family member.

 Disposable income.

 Additional descriptions, classifications and traits of the target market.

 Target market needs and wants.

 Product decription.

Size of target market.

Growth trends.

 Media habits.

 Organizational Buyers.

Amount of money available or budgeted for the purchase.

MBA MARKET PLAN LANCE LEE LAWSON..cont…

Purchase history.

Additional industrial buyer information.

 Competition.

 Resources of the Firm.

 Technological Environment.

 Economic Environment.

 Political Environment.

 Legal and Regulatory environment.

 Social and cultural environment.

 Other Aspects

 Problems and opportunities.

 Sources of information for completing the environmental questions form.

 Primary Research.

 Summary.

 STEP 3………………..ESTABLISHING GOALS AND OBJECTIVES.

 Establishing objectives.

 Ten criteria to help develop objectives.

 Goals.

 The Concept of Competitive or Differential Advantage.

 Summary.

 STEP 4…………Developing-marketing strategy.

 The Strategy pyramid.

 Strategic Marketing Management.

 The four cell portfolio matrix for decision making in Strategic mkt. mgmt.

 Product life cycle analysis.

 Introductory Stage.

 Growth.

 Maturity.

 Decline.

 Locating the product in its product life cycle.

 Developing strategies for the product in each stage of the product life cycle.

 Alternative Strategies for the marketing plan.

 New market penetration.

 Entry,

Ninch,

Dimension,

Positioning.

 Market share expansion.

 Product differentiation versus market segmentation.

 Limited versus general expansion.

 Entrenchment.

 Repositioning.

Direct Confrontation.

 Withdrawal.

 Summary.

 STEP 5………CHAP 6…………DEVELOPING MARKETING TACTICS.

 Manipulating the controllable variables.

 Product.

 Price.

 Other Tactical Pricing Tactics.

 Place.

 Promotion.

Use of sales promotion tactics.

 Advertising and publicity tactics.

 Manipulating Marketplace environments.

 Tactical questions for the marketing plan.

 Summary.

MBA MARKET PLAN LANCE LEE LAWSON.cont..

 STEP 6 ……CHAPTER 7………….FORECASTING FOR YOUR MARKETING PLAN.

 Difference between market potential, sales potential, and sales forecast.

 Finding market potential.

 The Index method of calculating market potential.

 Bottom up and top down sales forecasting.

 Executive Judgement.

 Sales force composite.

 Trend projections.

 Industrial Survey.

 Regression Analysis.

 Intention to buy survey.

 Exponential Smoothing.

 Leading Indicators.

 Which method to use. All of them.

 Information you need for forecasting.

 The project development schedule.

 The break-even analysis.

 The Balance sheet, projected profit and loss statement, and cash flow projections.

 Summary.

 STEP 7……………..CHAPTER 8……..CALCULATING IMPORTANT FINANCIAL RATIOS FOR PLAN.

 Measures of Liquidity.

 The current Ratio.

 The acid test or quick ratio.

 Average collection period.

 Inventory turnover.

 Profitability measures.

 Assets earning power.

 Return on owners equity.

 Net profit on sales.

 Investment turnover.

 Return on investment ROI.

 Sources of ratio analysis from all industries.

 Summary.

 STEP 8……CHAPTER 9………PRESENTING THE MARKETING PLAN.

 The marketing plan as a product.

 The formal presentation.

Intro.

Why u will succeed.

Strategy and tactics.

Forecasts and financial information.

Conclusion.

 Preparing for your presentation.

 Planning for visual aids.

Slides.

Overheads.

Handouts.

Charts.

Chalkboards.

 Use of products as visual aids.

 The practice sequence.

 The importance of controlling your time.

 Questions and answers and how to prepare for them.

 Use of the mental visualization Technique.

 The keys to success for marketing plan presentations.

 Summary.

 STEP 9……IMPLEMENTATION.

 TRACK ALL AND REACT ACCORDINGLY.

The Marketing Planning Outline

I. Executive Summary

A. Marketing Plan Overview

1. Key Points of Marketing Plan

2. Organizational Mission and Marketing Plan Relationship

II. Situation Analysis

A. Business and Product/Service Description

1. Describe the Industry

2. Describe the Business

3. Describe the Product/Service and the Fit

B. Market Environment

1. Describe the Market Potential

2. Define the Actual Market Size

3. Describe Demand Trend for Product/Service

4. Identify Current Market Segments

5. Describe Market Segments Currently Targeted

6. Specify Immediate Competitors

7. Describe Differential Advantage(s) by Segment

8. Describe Product/Service Usage

9. Compare the Competitive Players

10. Compare Competitor's Resources/Willingness

11. Identify Additional Segments to Target

12. Analyze Potential Competition

C. Macro Environment

1. Define the Impact of Economic Trends

2. Define the Impact of Social/Cultural Trends

3. Define the Impact of Political/Legal Trends

4. Define the Impact of Related Technology

D. Organizational Environment

1. Describe Capabilities and Responsiveness

2. Describe Organizational Support/Willingness

E. Recommendations for Market Research

1. Specify Information Necessary to Collect

2. Choose Primary vs. Secondary Research

F. Threats and Opportunities

1. Write Threat Statements

2. Write Opportunity Statements

G. Strengths and Weaknesses

1. Write Strength Statements

2. Write Weakness Statements

H. Key Assumptions

1. Write Assumptions for Each T/O and S/W

2. Describe Scenario for Dynamic Interactions

III. Marketing Plan Objectives

A. Organizational Mission and Goals/Objectives

1. Specify the Organizational Mission and Objectives

B. Marketing Objectives

1. Write Objectives for Marketing Plan

IV. Market Selection: Target Markets

A. Strategy - Product Positioning

1. Specify Product Position for Marketing Objective

B. Strategy - Perceptual Positioning

1. Determine Optimal Perceptual Position(s)

V. Marketing Strategy & Marketing Mix

A. Strategy - Product/Service

1. Determine Current Product Fit Per Segment

2. Describe Required Product Additions/Modifications

3. Formulate Additional Product Strategies

The Marketing Planning Outline..cont…

 

B. Strategy - Distribution

1. Describe Distribution Fit Per Segment

2. Describe Additional/Modified Distribution Per Segment

3. Modify Distribution for Efficiency/Effectiveness

C. Strategy - Price

1. Describe Pricing Fit Per Segment

2. Describe Required Pricing Modifications Per Segment

3. Formulate Additional Pricing Strategies

D. Strategy - Promotion

1. Prepare Refined Messages

2. Describe Optimal Promotional Mix

VI. Action Program

A. Product

1. Write Tactical Product Objective

2. Specify Activities Required

B. Marketing Channels

1. Write Tactical Objective for Channel Distribution

2. Specify Activities Required

C. Physical Distribution

1. Write Tactical Objective for Physical Distribution

2. Specify Activities Required

D. Price

1. Write Tactical Pricing Objective

2. Specify Activities Required

E. Advertising

1. Write Tactical Objective for Advertising

2. Specify Activities Required

F. Personal Selling

1. Write Tactical Objective for Personal Selling

2. Specify Activities Required

G. Sales Promotion

1. Write Tactical Objectives for Sales Promotion

2. Specify Activities Required

H. Publicity

1. Write Tactical Objectives for Publicity

2. Specify Activities Required

I. Other Promotion

1. Write Tactical Objectives for Other Promotion

2. Specify Activities Required

VII. Budget, Control and Accountability

A. Operational Budgets

1. Prepare an Operational Budget

B. Final Forecasts

1. Calculate Final Forecasts

C. Monitoring Systems

1. Specify Reporting Functions, Times and Responsibilities

 

The Modern Marketing Planner 

Glossary of Selected Marketing Management Terms  

 adoption process - the procedure an individual goes through when purchasing or

deciding to utilize a product/service. The adoption process consists of six

stages: awareness, interest, evaluation, trial, adoption, and confirmation.

The rate of adoption depends on the traits of consumers, the product/service,

and the organizations's marketing effort. 

 

see website for all……………

Web-Based Marketing – condensed

 

The Web provides many opportunities for a business to greatly increase its exposure to potential customers. If a company's business is a @retail outlet or a service that can be performed remotely, it can use a Web site to provide an on-line catalog of goods or services.

Web-based brochure.

The steps needed to complete this task are:

Defining the goals of the site

Outlining the structure of the site

Designing the guide's graphics and images

Creating the response forms

Reusing previously written elements

Adding action with JavaScript

Defining Goals

Creating a Corporate Presence On-Line

Creating the Body Text

Creating the Graphics and Images

Creating the Input Forms

Writing the Pages

The England Page

Adding a JavaScript Marquee

See web site for all.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MGT 4900, Business Policy, CSU, Stanislaus


Business Policy

BUSINESS:

POLICY:

1. a. prudence or wisdom in the management of affairs.

b. management or procedure based primarily on material interest.


2. a. a definite course or method of action selected from alternatives and in light of given

conditions to guide and determine present & future decisions.

b. a high-level overall plan embracing the general goals and acceptable procedures .

MANAGE:

1. a. to handle or direct with a degree of skill or address.

b. to treat with care.

c. to exercise executive, administrative & supervisory direction of.

2. a. to direct or carry on business or affairs.

b. to achieve one’s purpose.

 STRATEGY:

1. a. generalship (Greek root: strategis)

note the military implication of this word

2. a. a careful plan or method

b. the art of devising or employing plans and stratagems toward a goal.

STRATEGIC:

1. a. necessary to or important in the initiation, conduct or completion of a strategic plan.

b. of great importance within an integrated whole or to a planned effect.

 ORGANIZE:

1. to cause or develop an organic structure.

2. to arrange or form into a coherent unity or functioning whole.

3. to set up an administrative structure for.

4. at arrange elements into a whole of interdependent parts.

 ORGANIZATION:

1. the act or process of organizing or of being organized

2. a. an association or society

b. an administrative or functional structure and the personnel of such structure .


Definitions of Strategy in Business Policy

 Chandler (1962):

"…the determination of the basic long-term goals and objectives of an enterprise, and the adoption of courses of action and the allocation of resources necessary for carrying out these goals."

 Ansoff (1965):

Strategy is composed of four components:

(1) Product/market scope

(2) Growth Vector

(3) Competitive Advantage

(4) Synergy

 Andrews (1965):

"…the pattern of objectives, purposes or goals and major policies and the plans for achieving these goals, stated in such a way as to define what business the company is in or is to be in and the kind of company it is or is to be."

 "The ability to identify the four components of strategy -

 (1) Market Opportunity,

(2) Corporate Competencies and Resources,

MGT 4900, Business Policy, CSU, Stanislaus..cont…

 

(3) Personal Values and Aspirations, and

(4) Acknowledged obligations to segments of society

other than stockholders,

 - is nothing compared to the art of reconciling their implications in a final choice of purpose."

 LEVELS OF STRATEGY

 ENVIRONMENTAL CONSIDERATIONS


GOAL FORMULATION

 

THE THREE STRATEGY MAKING TASKS

Developing a Mission

*** The Role of Entrepreneurship***

Establishing Objectives

Crafting a Strategy

 WHAT EFFECTIVE GENERAL MANAGERS REALLY DO  How To Conduct an Industry Analysis

Obtaining the Overview:

 RAW DATA CATEGORIES FOR INDUSTRY ANALYSIS

 DATA CATEGORIES COMPILATION

STRUCTURAL DETERMINANTS OF THE

INTENSITY OF COMPETITION

 II. Bargaining Power of Suppliers

III. Intensity of Rivalry among Existing Competitors:

IV. Threat of New Entrants depends on Barriers to Entry:

V. Pressure from Substitute Products

CONDUCTING A COMPANY SITUATION ANALYSIS

 2. Competitive Assessment (SWOT)

 3. Competitive Strength Assessment

4. Financial Assessment

 5. Conclusions concerning Competitive Position

6. Major Strategic Issues/Problems

7. Recommendations/Strategies for Success

THE COMPETITOR RESPONSE PROFILE

SEE WEB FOR ALL………..

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MGT 4900, Business Policy, CSU, Stanislaus,

Strategic Management notes

Integration Strategies

 

Forward integration Ownership or increased control over distributors or retailers.

Backward integration Ownership or increased control over suppliers.

Horizontal integration Ownership or increased control over competitors.

Intensive Strategies

Market Penetration Increased share for present products by increased effort.

Market Development New or present products into new areas.

Product Development Improving or Modification of product for increased sales.

Diversification Strategies

Concentric Diversification Adding new but related products.

Horizontal Diversification Adding new Unrelated products for present customers. Firm knows customers.

Conglomerate Diversification Adding new unrelated products. Firm not familiar with customer base.

Defensive Strategies

Joint Venture Two or more firms get together for benefit.

Retrenchment Organization regroups by cost and asset reduction to reverse failing mkt.share and profits.

Divestiture Selling part of the company off, for raising capital and other reasoning.

Liquidation Selling all of the company assets.

Combination Many if not most use this method.

Summary

Mergers/Buyouts.

Mergers By similar sized companies.

Leveraged Buyouts Shareholders are bought out.

Generic Strategies

Cost Leadership strategies Striving to be the low cost provider. ~WalMart

Differentiation Strategies To stand out,~service,performance,useful life,ease of use.

Focus Strategies Concentration after certain customer or area attributes.

The Value Chain Making the finished product more valuable than the materials alone.

Competitive Advantage of Nations Benefits by natural resources, cheap labor, better education.

Mission

Purpose To state philosophy, beliefs, principles, defining the business.

Importance of So all will know, to allocate resources, for biz climate, a focal point, for objectives, work structures, company purpose.

Vision vs. Mission Mission is now, vision is later.

Process Select articles, show mgrs, get input, modify new statement.

Attitudes Mission is a declaration of attitude.

Divergent Views Expect and settle

Customer Orientation Good mission reflects the anticipation of the customers.

Social Policy Strategists considers what is owed to whom.

Components Since often most visible, have these in it.

Who are the customers

What are our services

Where does firm compete

Is technology a concern

Is firm committed to economic objectives.

Philosophies of firm.

Firms assets~ Self-concept

Public image concern

Employee concern

Writing and evaluation Study others.

Discussions

Modifications

Disbursement

External Audit

Key Forces Changes here affect all. Make advantages out of these. Some companies exist solely out of external changes.

MGT 4900, Business Policy, CSU, Stanislaus,

Strategic Management notes

Integration Strategies……cont…

 

Process Of Include as many people as possible, get competitive intelligence about environment, monitor, get reports.

Info.Technology Identifying and evaluating opportunities and threats. Chief Tech Off. =CTO

Economic Forces Direct impact on attractiveness of strategies, locations, Global , unequal effects.

Social Forces New trends are shaping new needs, ~ more houses have unrelated than related.

Cultural Forces Church membership down, fitness down, more educated, aging, environmental, minorities.

Demographic Forces People to south and west, Data at census bureau, leisure time.

Environmental Forces Life styles, sex roles, buying habits, ozone, disposable income, recycling, life styles, life expectancy, special interest groups.

Political Forces Can represent threats and opportunities, ~ trade sanctions, dump closing, Extinction, political unrest, policy actions.

Governmental Forces Above, product dumping, outside CO’s getting economics of scale 1ST ,

Legal Forces Special interest groups, EPA, FDA, OSHA, FCC, see texts.

Technological Forces Super conductivity, satellite networks, CAD,CAM, CNC,CIM, Obsolete?, new markets, new advantages, CO’s lack here. EDI.

Competitive Forces Collection of information here is vital for success, these are War Games.

Intelligence Programs Have understanding, find vulnerabilities, assess what-ifs, competitor’s logic and planning, commercial databases exist, ~Dialog.

Cooperation Among Used more now, Europe better at this, Suppliers for each other. Alliances here, US Asian Firms.

Sources Info. Unpublished ~ surveys, Mkt.research, speeches, TV, Stakeholders.

Indexes ~Applied Science & Technology Index=200 journals in fields, some updated weekly,

On-Line Data SEE directory of on-line databases, 2000 companies offer these, p 133,

Publications Forbes, business week, Dun-Bradstreet, Survey of manufactures.

Fore-Casting Tools ~Educated guesses, innovation, culture, new products, improved prod, stronger competitors, Gov.

Models Published sources sometimes best for variables, QUANTITATIVE, QUALITATIVE.

Quantitative methods Most appropriate when historic data exists, and relationships among key variables remain the same in future.

Three Quantitative methods Econometric models, Regression, Trend expolation. With computers these faster and cheaper than Qualitative methods. Error measure.

Econometric models What if’s with simulation, with computers, most common today for forecasting economic variables.

Linear Regression Past will be like today ~ never is. As relationships less stable ~ quantitative forecast less accurate.

Qualitative Methods Sales force estimate, Juries of execution, Anticipatory surveys or Mkt. Research, Scenario forecasts, delphi forecasts, Brain Storming.

Qualitative methods require more intuitive skill. Must study the underlying bases for published forecast. Forecasts are VITAL for CO.

Assumptions Must do these for strategic operations.

Competitive Analysis

Firm Rivalry Usually the most powerful, intensity increase as # of firms increase, equal in size, demand falls, price cutting occurs, can switch EZ.

New Competitors When market entered easily, intensity increases. Strategist’s job=identify new firms, their MO, counter attack, capitalize on strengths-weakness.

Substitute Products This put a ceiling on price before consumer would change, best measure is the Inroads being made by competitor.

Suppliers Power Can effect the intensity of competition, often in best interest of both parties to work together. Firms may purchase suppliers sometimes.

Consumer Power If customers are concentrated , buy in volume, large = major force in intensity of competition. Common product moreso,

Industry Analysis

EFE Matrix ~ External Allows Strategists to summarize and evaluate the Environment. Social to political …..

1. List success factors.2.Assign weight factors to each.3.Assign weight factor of firm’s response to this,4.Multiply out.5.Sum out.

Relationships ……………..see web for all………………..

 

 

Early software usage and experience

 

Early software usage and experience. cont. 2001 see below

 

 

Software programs applied to 2001

MS OFFICE 95-XP

Norton Utilities to 2000

ACT ! 4.0

Adobe Acrobat to 5

MS Windows 2000

Winfax-Talkworks 10

Voice Activation

Keystone Learning Sys.

AutoCAD to 2000

MS Explorer

MS Windows CE

Photo-editing S/W

MS Windows NT4

Video Capture S/W

Firewall S/W

Graphics S/W

MS Digital Dashboard

Internet searching S/W

BIZ CD’s 4 Marketing

Numerous Tutorials

OCR S/W

Troubleshooting S/W

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Early database of applications ~1992

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Early Periodical readings ~ 1997 to 2001

 

Periodicals of industry presently received-added since above list.

Wideband

Mobile Computing

Call Center

Electronic Commerce

Sales Automation

Internet Telephony

Industry Standard

Presentations

Intelligence Enterprise

Manufacturing Systems

Information Week

Business Finance

DB2 Magazine

Smart Reseller

Industrial Control Systems

Electronic Publishing

Knowledge Management

Design Construction

Imaging Magazine

CFO

Customer Support

Computer Telephony

Research and Development

Internet World

Managing Automation

Fiberoptic Product News

etc…

 

 

Completed College Coursework, Lance Lawson

 

Engineering

 

Business

Business cont.

Mechanical Drafting

Chemistry 1+ years

Introduction to Business

Principles of Marketing

Descriptive Geometry

Math Algebra 1 year

Business Information Systems

Networking Computers

Engineering Graphics

Physics 1+ years

Small Business Operations

Computer Graphics

Properties of materials

Trigonometry

Business Law

Computer Accounting

Construction Estimating

Analytical Geometry

Microcomputer Hardware

Continued below

 CSUS CIS and OM

 

 

Spreadsheet Software

Microcomputer Software

 

Supervision

Psychology

Accounting, financial and managerial

Economics 1 year

 

 

 

Statistics

 

 

 

 

Stanislaus State University .. CSUS

 

Computers

Business

Operations

 

Management of Info Systems

Finite Math

Management Theory

 

Programming, Visual Basic

International Business

Quantitative Analysis

 

Database Management Systems

Business Finance

Production-Operations Management

 

Decision Support Systems

Business Technical Writing

Total Quality Control

 

System Analysis and Design

Organization and Environment

Planning and Control Systems

 

Cobol Programming

Business Policy

Productivity Management

 

Information Systems Management

MBA Strategic Marketing

MBA Global Operations

 

Decision Support Project

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lance Lawson Resume 209 544 0518…..see updated one, 2002

Objective:    To apply the following toward an operational position.

 

Summary of Skills:

 

§         State Licensed Vocational Instructor: Microcomputer applications, Network technical support and Computer technology.

§         Job placement and development. Computer course(s) material preparation, lecturing, administration reports, and marketing. Graduation

§         CSUS B.S. dual concentration in Computer Information Systems and Operations Management.

§         A.S. Degree in Engineering Technology. Modesto Junior College.

§         Store / department operations. Sales of office equipment and computer products. Office Depot.

§         Six years industrial fabrication. Millwright / sheet metal.

§         Microsoft Certified Professional. 1999

§         A+ (Computer Technician Certification). 1999

§         Network+ (Computer Networking Certification). 2001

§         Operational maintenance of up to 65 IBM compatible computers and peripherals.

§         Presently working on Internet Certification.

Work Experience:


3/98-Present.    Operations assistant / Instructor / Partner. Community Business School, Modesto, CA.

 

3/97-2/98         Operations assistant. General Engineering Contractor. D & M  Hancock, Inc. Modesto, CA.


4/92–Present.   Owner. Lawson Computing.  Consulting and training, Modesto, CA.

7/90-4/92        Department operations, Office Club-Depot. Modesto, CA.

 

12/87-7/90      Management. Store Operation. Future Communications Company. Modesto, CA.


6/81 - 10/87     Industrial Journeyman, Sheet Metal Union local 162. Industrial fabrication. central valley.

§         Store room clerk  

§         Painting

§         Yard man

§         Rigging

 

Lance Lawson Professional Development

1997-2001

 

 

Year:

Accomplishment:

Applications:

1997

Passed millwright journeyman exam

Equipment setting and rebuilding. Millwright Local 102, Oakland California. see previous sheet-metal and ironwork experience, 5 yrs.

 

Estimator assistant for General Engineering Contractor, Bid prepare. Field/office support.

Overall company growth and move into larger facility.

Acquire specifics on projects. Computerization of system to increase sub contractors bids.

Increase of received bids over previous system by 150%.

Career change-partial business ownership, state vocational school.

1998

State Licensed Vocational Instructor certification. CA cert# 134704.

Applications: Microcomputer applications.

Course syllabus development, class lecturing, grading, graduation ceremonies. Windows with MS Office Professional 95-97. Internet applications.

 

Computer resource manager

Computer operations including maintenance, purchases, setup, and management of 40 computers.

 

School Administration

School database and administrative applications completed. Marketing to businesses and agencies. Course syllabuses developed.

 

School growth from 10 to 40 computers.

Additional classrooms set up.

Vocational School Administration-Teaching and Professional Development.

1999

Microsoft Certification received in the Windows Operating System.

MS Cert # 1441144.

Course development in MS Windows Office Professional 95-97 and Microsoft Windows. Program logic with lectures and examples.

 

 

Computer Technology Industry Association: Technician Certification [A+]

# DB7DTT5189.

Vocational course development, A+ computer technician certification. Class Instruction, handouts, lectures, testing.

 

Job Placement. As high as 20 placements a month and 150 to 250 resumes sent a day into central California for graduate placements. Average placements 12-18 month.

Vocational school job placement with 200 graduates. Resume development, counseling, company contacts and student to job positions. Most graduates paid only if placement occurred thru state program.

 

Student Recruitment

Placement mandatory for payment from state agency, selection is major issue. Guidelines for selection developed and implemented.

 

School growth from 40 to 55 computers.

Additional classrooms set up.

 

2000

Accreditation process of school.

Job Placement.

Course syllabuses hour by hour.
Windows Operating Systems and Technician electives developed.

 

Lance Lawson Professional Development

1997-2001…cont…..

 

 

2000

School growth from 55 to 65 computers

Additional classrooms setup and applied.

 

Seminars in classroom management, teacher training and customer service.

Hundreds of adult students addressed, trained and worked with in placement.

 

2001

Computer Technology Industry Association: Network Technician Certification [Network+]

# DB7DTT5189.

500 hour course development in A+ Computer Technician certification. Hour by hour lesson plans. Teaching of class and labs. Tests developed and graded.

 

Additional State Vocational teaching categories in Network Technical Support and Computer Technology received.

Computer Networking with Windows 98 and 2000. Sharing resources and applications. Over 500 students trained to date.

 

 

Networked classrooms using Internet applications and techniques. Using networks to train individuals and groups.

 

 

 

2001 Personal Development and Training

2001

Online training, seminars and purchased materials-videos.

Training in Communications, Executive skills, General Business, Management, Personal Development and Sales-Marketing techniques.

 

Purchased Videotapes, cassettes, books, and online training materials.

 

 

Subscriptions to a vast array (50) of industry applications of magazines and newsletters.

Computer, Operations, Graphics, Engineering, Business, Construction and Computers.

2002

Computer Technology Industry Association: Internet Technician Certification [Internet+]

#. AUG 20001

School accreditation preparation and course development. Accreditation received.

 

2003

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2003

 

Microsoft computer training in Windows XP-2000 arena toward the MCSE and MCSA certification. Windows 2003 Server changes.

Windows NT migrating to 2000 training.

 

Security, Linux, and MS 2000 & Linux training received.

 

 

 

Continued executive training with complete list on website.

www.Lawsoncomputing.com.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MBA Work

Global Operations Management

Diagrams / Graphs / Ratios / Tables used in G.O.M.

Terms and Topics Covered in G.O.M.

Case Studies

Marketing Management

 

Terms and Topics Covered in Marketing Mgmt.

Case Studies

Global Operations Management

Terms and Topics Covered in G.O.M.

 

Introduction Global Operations Management.

 

Ch 1 Introduction, History, Globalization

Ch 2 Operations in Global Business Strategy

Ch 3 Improving Operations Performance

Ch 4 ...Improving Global Supply Chain .....................Performance

Ch 5 ...Pushing The Limits of Global ..............Operational Performance. see my web for all.

 

 

Diagrams / Graphs / Ratios / Tables used in G.O.M.

Introduction:

Direct Foreign Investment, Trends.

Real per Capita, Growth of World GDP.

Exchange Rate Histories.

Enrollment Ratios in Schooling.

Scientists and Engineers employed in R & D.

Foreign Assets vs Foreign Sales.

Fraction of MNC's by region.

Percent of US-Others Joint Ventures.

Growth of GNP ~ Internationally.