100 examples in Business, Operations and Engineering.
Click Here

           Apply  Worldwide Now        

Do it once, do it right, and do it now.

Email Lawson Computing

Back to Lawson Computing Homepage

Apply as needed, when needed.

 

System Analysis and Design

Click on desired chapter to read in the below table

ch 1 Role of System Analysis

ch 9 Data Flow Diagrams

ch 17 Designing the DataBase

ch 2 Impact of Information sys

ch 10 Analyzing Systems

ch 18 Design User Interface

ch 3 Feasibility and Managing.

ch 11 Process Specifications

ch 19 Data Entry Planning

ch 4 Investigating hard data

ch 12 Decision support Sys

ch 20 Quality Assurance

ch 5 Interviewing

ch 13 Preparing the System Proposal

ch 21 Implementing the Info System

ch 6 Using Questionnaires

ch 14 Write-Presenting the Proposal

ch 22 Object-Oriented Analysis

ch 7 Observing Behavior

ch 15 Designing Output

Topics / Notes Below

Ch 8 Prototyping

ch 16 Designing Input

...........Email me

 

 

 

 

Chap 1. Assuming the role as Systems Analyst.

Information as a organizational resource.

Managing information as a resource.

Managing computer-generated information.

System analysis and design concepts.

Transaction processing systems.

Office automation systems and knowledge work systems.

Management information systems.

Decision support systems.

Expert systems and artificial intelligence.

Group decision support systems.

Executive support systems.

Need for system analysis and design.

End users.

Role of the Systems Analysis

System analysis as a consultant.

System analysis as a supporting expert.

System analyst as a agent of change.

Qualities of the system analyst.

The systems development life cycle.

Identifying problems, opportunities, and objectives.

Determining information requirements.

Analyzing system needs.

Designing the recommended system.

Developing and documenting software.

Testing and maintaining the system.

Implementing and evaluating the system.

The impact of maintenance.

Using case tools.

Increasing analyst productivity.

Improving analyst - user communication.

Providing a means of communication.

Integrating life cycle activities.

Accurately assessing maintenance changes

UPPER AND LOWER CASE.

Upper case tools.

Lower case tools.

Software Reverse engineering and reengineering.

Object oriented systems analysis and design.

Need for structured analysis and design.

Alternative methodologies.

Summary

information is a resource.MIS/DSS/KWS/TPS. Syste

Back to TOP

Chapter 2

Understanding organizational style and it’s impact on information systems.

Organizational fundamentals.

Organizations as systems.

Interrelatedness and interdependence of Systems.

Organizational boundaries.

System feedback for planning and control.

Environments for organizational systems.

Openness and closeness in organizations.

Taking a systems perspective.

Depicting systems graphically.

Systems and the context level data flow diagram.

Systems and the entity relationship diagram.

Levels of management.

Operations Management.

Middle management.

Strategic management.

Implications for information systems development.

Organizational culture.

Summary

Back to TOP

Chap 3

Determining feasibility and managing analysis and design activities.

Project fundamentals.

Project initiation.

Problems within the organization.

Opportunities for improvement.

Selections of projects.

Determining feasibility.

Defining objectives.

Determining resources.

Technical feasibility.

Economic feasibility.

Operational feasibility.

Judging feasibility.

Activity Planning and control.

Estimating time required.

Using Gantt charts for project scheduling.

Using PERT diagrams.

Identifying the critical path.

Computer based project scheduling.

Managing analysis and design activities.

Communication strategies for managing teams.

Setting project productivity goals.

Motivating project team members.

Avoiding project failures.

Summary

 Back to TOP

CHAP 4, SAMPLING AND

INVESTIGATING HARD DATA.

SAMPLING.

NEED FOR SAMPLING.

SAMPLING DESIGN.

DETERMINING THE DATA TO BE COLLECTED OR DESCRIBED.

DETERMINING THE POPULATION TO BE SAMPLED.

CHOOSING THE TYPE OF SAMPLE.

CONVENIENCE SAMPLING

PURPOSIVE SAMPLING

SIMPLE RANDOM SAMPLES

COMPLEX RANDOM SAMPLING

DECIDING THE SAMPLE SIZE

 

THE SAMPLE SIZE QUESTION.

DETERMINING SAMPLE SIZE WHEN SAMPLING DATA ON ATTRIBUTES.

DETERMINING SAMPLE SIZE WHEN SAMPLING DATA ON VARIABLES.

DETERMINING SAMPLE SIZE WHEN SAMPLING QUALITATIVE DATA.

KINDS OF INFORMATION SOUGHT IN INVESTIGATION.

TYPES OF HARD DATA.

ANALYZING QUANTITATIVE DOCUMENTS

REPORTS USED IN DECISION MAKING.

PERFORMANCE REPORTS.

RECORDS.

DATA CAPTURE FORMS.

ANALYZING QUALITATIVE DOCUMENTS

MEMOS

SIGNS ON BULLETIN BOARDS OR IN WORK AREAS.

MANUALS.

POLICY HANDBOOKS.

ABSTRACTING DATA FROM ARCHIVAL DOCUMENTS.

SUMMARY.

 Back to TOP

CHAP 5 interviewing.

Kinds of information sought.

Planning the interview.

Read background material.

Establish interview objectives.

Decide who to interview.

Prepare the interviewee.

Decide on question types and structure.

Question types.

 

Probes.

Question pitfalls.

Avoiding leading questions.

Avoid double barreled questions.

Arranging questions in a logical sequence.

Using a pyramid structure.

Using a funnel structure.

Using a diamond shape structure.

Structured vs. Unstructured interviews.

Making a record of the interview.

Using a tape recorder.

Notetaking.

Before the interview.

Conducting the actual interview.

Beginning the interview.

Writing the interview report.

Joint application design. JAD

Summary

  Back to TOP

CHAP 6 USING QUESTIONNAIRES.

PLANNING FOR THE USE OF QUESTIONNAIRES.

WRITING QUESTIONS.

OPEN ENDED QUESTIONS

CLOSED QUESTIONS

CHOICE OF WORDS

 

USING SCALES IN QUESTIONNAIRES

SCALING FUNDAMENTALS

REASONING FOR SCALING

MEASUREMENT

VALIDITY AND RELIABILITY.

DESIGNING AND ADMINISTERING THE QUESTIONNAIRE.

DESIGNING THE QUESTIONNAIRE.

QUESTIONNAIRE FORMAT

ALLOW AMPLE WHITE SPACE.

ALLOW RESPONSE SPACE.

ASK RESPONDENTS TO CIRCLE THEIR ANSWERS.

USE OBJECTIVES TO HELP DETERMINE FORMAT.

BE CONSISTENT IN STYLE

ORDER OF QUESTIONS

QUESTIONS OF IMPORTANCE TO RESPONDENTS GO FIRST.

CLUSTER ITEMS OF SIMILAR CONTENT TOGETHER.

EMPLOY RESPONDENTS ASSOCIATIONAL TENDENCIES.

BRING UP LESS CONTROVERSIAL ITEMS FIRST.

 

ADMINISTERING THE QUESTIONNAIRE

RESPONDENTS

METHODS OF ADMINISTERING THE QUESTIONNAIRE.

SUMMARY

  Back to TOP

CHAP 7 OBSERVING DECISION MAKER BEHAVIOR

AND OFFICE ENVIRONMENT.

 

KINDS OF INFORMATION SOUGHT

 

OBSERVING A DECISION MAKER’S BEHAVIOR.

OBSERVING A MANAGER’S DECISION MAKING ACTIVITIES.

TIME AND EVENT SAMPLING.

OBSERVING THE DECISION MAKER’S BODY LANGUAGE.

ADJECTIVE PAIRS AND CATEGORIES.

THE ANALYST’S PLAY SCRIPT.

 

OBSERVING THE PHYSICAL ENVIRONMENT

STRUCTURED OBSERVATION OF THE ENVIRONMENT.

STROBE ELEMENTS

OFFICE LOCATION

PLACEMENT OF THE DECISION MAKER’S DESK.

STATIONARY OFFICE EQUIPMENT.

PROPS

TRADE JOURNALS AND NEWSPAPER

OFFICE LIGHTING AND COLOR.

CLOTHING WORN BY DECISION MAKER’S.

APPLICATION ALTERNATIVES.

ANALYSIS OF PHOTOGRAPHS.

CHECKLIST/LIKERT SCALE APPROACH

ANECDOTAL LIST (WITH SYMBOLS)

OBSERVATION/NARRATIVE COMPARISON

SUMMARY

 Back to TOP

 

CHAP 8 PROTOTYPING

KINDS OF INFORMATION SOUGHT

INITIAL USER REACTIONS.

USER SUGGESTIONS

INNOVATIONS

REVISION PLANS

APPROACHES TO PROTOTYPING

KINDS OF PROTOTYPES

PATCHED UP PROTOTYPING

NONOPERATIONAL PROTOTYPE

FIRST OF A SERIES PROTOTYPE

SELECTED FEATURES PROTOTYPE

PROTOTYPING AS AN ALTERNATIVE TO THE SYSTEMS DEVELOPMENT LIFE CYCLE.

DEVELOPING A PROTOTYPE

GUIDELINES FOR DEVELOPMENT OF A PROTOTYPE.

WORKING IN MANAGEABLE MODULES

BUILDING THE PROTOTYPE RAPIDLY

MODIFYING THE PROTOTYPE

STRESSING THE USER INTERFACE.

DISADVANTAGES OF PROTOTYPING

MANAGING THE PROJECT

ADOPTING AN INCOMPLETE SYSTEM AS COMPLETE.

ADVANTAGES OF PROTOTYPING

CHANGING THE SYSTEM EARLY IN IT’S DEVELOPMENT.

SCRAPPING UNDESIRABLE SYSTEMS.

DESIGNING A SYSTEM FOR USER’S NEEDS AND EXPECTATIONS.

USER’S ROLE IN PROTOTYPING

INTERACTIVE WITH THE PROTOTYPE.

EXPERIMENTING WITH THE PROTOTYPE.

GIVING OPEN REACTION TO THE PROTOTYPE.

SUGGESTING CHANGES TO THE PROTOTYPE.

SUMMARY.

 Back to TOP

Chap 9

Using data flow diagrams.

The data flow approach to requirements determination.

Advantages of the data flow approach.

Conventions used in data flow diagrams.

Developing data flow diagrams.

Creating the context diagram.

Drawing diagram 0 (the next level)

Start with the data flow from external entity on the input side.

Work backwards from the output data flow.

Examine the data flow to or from a data store.

Analyze a well designed process.

Take notes of any fuzzy areas.

Creating child diagrams (more detailed levels).

Checking the diagrams. Common errors.

Forgetting a data flow or pointing arrow in wrong direction.

Connecting data stores and external entities to each other.

Incorrectly labeling processes and or data flows.

Including more than 9 processes on a data flow diagram.

Omitting data flow, look for linear flow, this is actually rare.

Creating unbalanced decomposition in child diagrams.

LOGICAL AND PHYSICAL DATA FLOW DIAGRAMS.

Developing logical flow data flow diagrams.

Better communications with users.

More stable systems.

Better understanding of the business by Analyst.

Flexibility and maintenance.

Elimination’s of redundancies and easier creation of the physical model.

Developing physical data flow diagrams.

Clarifying which processes are Manuel and which are automated.

Describing processes in more detail than do logical data flow diagrams. DFD’s

Sequencing processes that have to be done in particular order.

Identifying temporary data stores.

Specifying actual names of files and printouts.

Adding controls to ensure processes are done correctly.

PARTITIONING DATA FLOW DIAGRAMS.

Why

Different users groups.

Timing of the processes.

Similar tasks.

Efficiency , upon analysis, processes combined.

Consistency of data.

Security.

A data flow example.

Create context diagram.

Drawing diagram 0.

Creating a child diagram.

Creating a physical data flow.

Partitioning the data flow diagram.

Using data flow diagrams.

 Summary

 

Back to TOP 

CHAPTER 10 ANALYZING SYSTEMS USING DATA DICTIONARIES.

THE DATA DICTIONARY.

NEED FOR UNDERSTANDING THE DATA DICTIONARY.

THE DATA REPOSITORY

DEFINING THE DATA FLOW.

DESCRIBING DATA STRUCTURES.

LOGICAL AND PHYSICAL DATA STRUCTURES

DATA ELEMENTS

DATA STORES

CREATING THE DATA DICTIONARY

ANALYZING INPUT AND OUTPUT.

DEVELOPING DATA STORES.

USING THE DATA DICTIONARY

 

SUMMARY

 

 

 Back to TOP

CHAP 11 DESCRIBING PROCESS

SPECIFICATIONS AND STRUCTURED DECISIONS.

METHODS AVAILABLE

OVERVIEW OF PROCESS SPECIFICATIONS.

PROCESS SPECIFICATION FORMAT.

INFORMATION REQUIRED FOR STRUCTURED DECISIONS.

STRUCTURED ENGLISH

WRITING STRUCTURED ENGLISH.

A STRUCTURED ENGLISH EXAMPLE.

DATA DICTIONARY AND PROCESS SPECIFICATIONS.

DECISION TABLES

DEVELOPING DECISION TABLES.

A DECISION TABLE EXAMPLE.

CHECKING FOR COMPLETENESS AND ACCURACY.

MORE ADVANCED DECISION TABLES.

DECISION TREES.

DRAWING DECISION TREES.

A COMPLEX DECISION TREE EXAMPLE.

CHOOSING A STRUCTURED DECISION ANALYSIS TECHNIQUE.

PHYSICAL AND LOGICAL PROCESS SPECIFICATIONS.

USING PROCESS SPECIFICATIONS: HORIZONTAL BALANCING.

HORIZONTAL BALANCING.

 

SUMMARY.

 

 

 Back to TOP

CHAPTER 12 ANALYZING SEMI STRUCTURED

DECISION SUPPORT SYSTEMS.

METHODS AVAILABLE

DECISION SUPPORT SYSTEMS.

CHARACTERISTICS OF A DECISION SUPPORT SYSTEM.

DECISION SUPPORT SYSTEM USERS.

DECISION MAKING CONCEPTS RELEVANT TO DSS.

DECISION MAKING UNDER RISK.

AN EXAMPLE OF UNCERTAINTY , CERTAINTY AND RISK.

DECISION MAKING STYLE.

ANALYTIC DECISION MAKING.

HEURISTIC DECISION MAKING.

IMPLICATIONS FOR DEVELOPMENT OF DECISION SUPPORT SYSTEMS.

PROBLEM SOLVING PHASES.

INTELLIGENCE.

DESIGN.

CHOICE.

SEMI STRUCTURED DECISIONS.

DIMENSIONS OF SEMI STRUCTURED DECISIONS.

DEGREE OF DECISION MAKING SKILL REQUIRED.

DEGREE OF PROBLEM COMPLEXITY.

NUMBER OF CRITERIA CONSIDERED

SEMI STRUCTURED DECISIONS IN INTELLIGENCE, DESIGN AND CHOICE.

INTELLIGENCE PHASE DECISION SUPPORT SYSTEMS.

DESIGN PHASE DECISION SUPPORT SYSTEMS.

CHOICE PHASE DECISION SUPPORT SYSTEMS.

MULTI CRITERIA DECISION MAKING.

USING A TRADE OFF PROCESS.

USING WEIGHTED METHODS.

USING SEQUENTIAL ELIMINATION BY LEXICOGRAPHY.

USING SEQUENTIAL ELIMINATION BY CONJUNCTIVE CONSTRAINTS.

USING GOAL PROGRAMMING.

SUMMARY

 

 Back to TOP

CHAPTER 13 PREPARING THE SYSTEM PROPOSAL.

METHODS AVAILABLE

ASCERTAINING THE HARDWARE AND SOFTWARE NEEDS.

INVENTORYING COMPUTER HARDWARE.

ESTIMATING WORKLOADS.

COMPUTER SIZE AND USE.

ACQUISITION OF COMPUTER EQUIPMENT.

EVALUATION OF VENDOR SUPPORT FOR COMPUTER HARDWARE.

SOFTWARE EVALUATION.

IDENTIFYING AND FORECASTING COSTS AND BENEFITS.

FORECASTING COSTS AND BENEFITS.

ESTIMATION OF TRENDS.

GRAPHICAL JUDGMENT.

THE METHOD OF LEAST SQUARES.

MOVING AVERAGES.

IDENTIFYING BENEFITS AND COSTS.

TANGIBLE BENEFITS.

INTANGIBLE BENEFITS.

TANGIBLE COSTS.

INTANGIBLE COSTS.

COMPARING COSTS AND BENEFITS.

BREAK EVEN ANALYSIS

PAYBACK

CASH FLOW ANALYSIS.

PRESENT VALUE.

GUIDELINES FOR ANALYSIS.

EXAMINING ALTERNATIVE SYSTEMS.

SUMMARY.

 Back to TOP

CHAP 14 WRITING AND PRESENTING THE SYSTEM PROPOSAL.

METHODS AVAILABLE

THE SYSTEM PROPOSAL

ORGANIZING THE SYSTEM PROPOSAL

WHAT TO INCLUDE IN THE SYSTEM PROPOSAL

COVER LETTER / TITLE PAGE / TABLE OF CONTENTS / EXECUTIVE SUMMARY.

OUTLINE OF SYSTEM STUDY/ DETAILED RESULTS OF SYSTEM STUDY /

SYSTEM ALTERNATIVE / SYSTEM ANALYST RECOMMENDATIONS / PROPOSAL

SUMMARY / APPENDICES.

CHOOSING A WRITING STYLE.

USING FIGURES FOR EFFECTIVE COMMUNICATION.

EFFECTIVE USE OF TABLES.

EFFECTIVE USE OF GRAPHS.

LINE GRAPHS.

COLUMN CHARTS.

BAR CHARTS.

PIE CHARTS.

EFFECTIVE USE OF SCHEDULING CHARTS AND DIAGRAMS.

GUIDELINES FOR USING FIGURES IN THE SYSTEM PROPOSAL.

ADOPTING A UNIFYING PROPOSAL STYLE.

VISUAL AND FORMATTING CONSIDERATIONS.

USE OF WHITE SPACE.

USE OF HEADINGS AND SUB HEADINGS.

PAGE NUMBERING.

REFERENCES AND APPENDICES.

PRESENTING THE SYSTEM PROPOSAL.

UNDERSTANDING THE AUDIENCE.

ORGANIZATION OF THE SYSTEM PROPOSAL PRESENTATION.

PLANNING THE INTRODUCTION AND CONCLUSION.

FIELDING QUESTIONS.

USING VISUALS.

TAKING A PC INTO THE PRESENTATION.

USING PRESENTATION IN GRAPHICS PACKAGES.

PRINCIPLES OF DELIVERY.

THE FIRST GUIDELINE, BE YOURSELF.

THE SECOND , BE PREPARED.

THE THIRD , SPEAK NATURALLY.

THE FOURTH , REMEMBER TO BREATHE.

SUMMARY.

 Back to TOP

 

 

CHAPTER 15 DESIGNING EFFECTIVE OUTPUT.

OUTPUT DESIGN OBJECTIVES.

DESIGNING OUTPUT TO SERVE THE INTENDED PURPOSE.

DESIGNING THE OUTPUT TO FIT THE USER.

DELIVERING THE APPROPRIATE QUANTITY OF OUTPUT.

MAKE SURE OUTPUT IS WHERE IT IS NEEDED.

PROVIDE OUTPUT ON TIME.

CHOOSING THE RIGHT OUTPUT METHOD.

RELATING OUTPUT CONTENT TO OUTPUT METHOD.

CHOOSING OUTPUT TECHNOLOGY.

PRINTERS / SCREENS / MICROFILM,TAPES ~STORAGE /CD-ROM /

ELECTRONIC OUTPUT ~EMAIL /.

INTEGRATED OUTPUT OFFICE MACHINES. ~ MICROSOFT AT WORK.

FACTORS TO CONSIDER WHEN CHOOSING OUTPUT TECHNOLOGY.

WHO WILL USE THE OUTPUT.

HOW MANY PEOPLE NEED THE OUTPUT.

WHERE IS THE OUTPUT NEEDED.

WHAT IS THE PURPOSE OF THE OUTPUT.

WHAT IS THE SPEED WITH WHICH OUTPUT IS NEEDED.

HOW OFTEN WILL THE OUTPUT BE ACCESSED.

HOW LONG MUST THE OUTPUT BE STORED.

UNDER WHAT REGULATIONS IS THE OUTPUT PRODUCED ~ W-2.

WHAT ARE THE INITIAL AND CONTINUING COSTS OF MAINTENANCE AND

SUPPLIES.

WHAT ARE THE ENVIRONMENTAL REQUIREMENTS FOR OUTPUT

TECHNOLOGIES.

REALIZING HOW OUTPUT BIAS AFFECTS USERS.

RECOGNIZING BIAS IN THE WAY OUTPUT IS USED.

INTRODUCING BIAS WHEN INFORMATION IS SORTED.

INTRODUCING BIAS BY SETTING LIMITS.

INTRODUCING BIAS THROUGH GRAPHICS.

AVOIDING BIAS IN THE DESIGN OF OUTPUT.

DESIGNING PRINTED OUTPUT.

GUIDELINES FOR PRINTED REPORT DESIGN.

REPORT DESIGN CONVENTIONS.

PAPER QUALITY , TYPE AND SIZE.

SPECIAL OUTPUT FORMS.

DESIGN CONSIDERATIONS.

FUNCTIONAL ATTRIBUTES.

STYLISTIC / AESTHETIC ATTRIBUTES.

STEPS IN PREPARING THE PRINTER LAYOUT WORKSHEET.

DESIGNING SCREEN OUTPUT.

GUIDELINES FOR SCREEN DESIGN.

A SCREEN DESIGN EXAMPLE.

TABULAR OUTPUT FOR DSS.

GRAPHICAL OUTPUT FOR DSS.

SUMMARY.

 

 Back to TOP

CHAP 16 DESIGNING EFFECTIVE INPUT

INPUT DESIGN OBJECTIVES.

GOOD FORM DESIGN.

FOUR GUIDELINES FOR FORM DESIGN.

MAKING FORMS EASY TO FEEL OUT.

FORM FLOW.

SEVEN SECTIONS OF A FORM.

CAPTIONING.

MEETING THE INTENDED PURPOSE.

ASSURING ACCURATE COMPLETION.

KEEPING FORMS ATTRACTIVE.

COMPUTER ASSISTED FORM DESIGN.

CONTROLLING BUSINESS FORMS.

GOOD SCREEN DESIGN.

FOUR GUIDELINES FOR SCREEN DESIGN.

KEEPING THE SCREEN SIMPLE.

THREE SCREEN SECTIONS.

USE WINDOWS.

KEEPING THE SCREEN CONSISTENT.

FACILITATING MOVEMENT.

SCROLLING.

CALLING UP MORE DETAIL.

ON SCREEN DIALOG.

DESIGNING AN ATTRACTIVE SCREEN.

INVERSE VIDEO AND BLINKING CURSORS.

USING DIFFERENT TYPE FONTS.

DIFFERENCES IN MAINFRAME AND MICROCOMPUTER SCREEN DESIGN.

ATTRIBUTES.

PROTECTION.

INTENSITY.

SHIFT AND EXTENDED ATTRIBUTES.

ATTRIBUTE CHARACTER CONSIDERATIONS.

SCREEN CODE GENERATION.

USING ICONS IN SCREEN DESIGN.

GRAPHICAL USER INTERFACE DESIGN.

USING COLOR IN SCREEN DESIGN.

SUMMARY.

 Back to TOP

 CHAP 17

DESIGNING THE FILE OR DATABASE.

Design objectives.

Conventional files and databases.

Conventional files.

Databases. Effective objectives.

Ensuring that data can be shared among users for a variety of applications.

Maintaining data that is both accurate and consistent.

Ensuring that all data required for current and future applications will be readily available.

Allowing the database to evolve and the needs of the users to grow.

Allowing the users to construct their own personal view of the data without concern for

without concern for the way the data is physically stored.

While doing.

Keeping the time to add,delete,modify and retrieve data to a minimum.

Keeping the cost of storage the data to a minimum.

Data concepts.

Reality, Data,Metadata.

Entities.

Relationships.

Attributes.

Records.

Keys.

Metadata.

File organization.

File types.

Master files.

Table files.

Transaction files.

Work files

Report files.

Sequential Organization.

Linked lists.

Hashed file organization.

Indexed organizations.

Indexed-sequential organization.

Database organization.

Hierarchical data structures.

Network data structures.

Relational data structures.

Normalization.

Three steps to normalization.

First normal form.

Second normal form.

Third normal form.

Using the entity relationship diagram to determine record keys.

One to many.

Many to many.

Guidelines for file/database relation design.

Each separate data entity should create a master file.

A specific data field should exit only on one master file. Except for key use.

Each master file should have programs to create,update, and delete the records.

Steps in retrieving and presenting data.

Choose a relation.

Join them.

Project columns from relations.

Select rows from relations.

Derive new attributes.

Index or sort rows.

Calculate totals and performance measures.

Present data.

Summary

 

Back to TOP

CHAPTER 18 DESIGNING THE USER INTERFACE.

USER INTERFACE OBJECTIVES.

TYPES OF USER INTERFACES.

NATURAL LANGUAGE INTERFACES.

QUESTION AND ANSWER INTERFACES.

MENUS.

FORM FILL INTERFACES (INPUT/OUTPUT FORMS).

COMMAND LANGUAGE INTERFACES.

GRAPHICAL USER INTERFACES GUI

DIALOG AND DESKTOPS.

GUIDELINES FOR DIALOG DESIGN.

COMMUNICATION.

MINIMAL USER ACTION.

STANDARD OPERATION AND CONSISTENCY.

CUSTOMIZING DESKTOPS.

OTHER USER INTERFACES.

FEEDBACK FOR USERS.

ACKNOWLEDGING ACCEPTANCE OF INPUT.

RECOGNIZING THAT INPUT IS IN THE CORRECT FORM.

NOTIFY THE USER THAT INPUT IS NOT IN PROPER FORM.

EXPLAINING A DELAY IN PROCESSING.

ACKNOWLEDGING THAT A REQUEST IS COMPLETED.

NOTIFYING THAT A REQUEST WAS NOT COMPLETED.

OFFERING THE USER MORE DETAILED FEEDBACK.

A VARIETY OF HELP OPTIONS.

DESIGNING QUERIES.

QUERY TYPES.

QUERY TYPE ONE.

QUERY TYPE TWO

QUERY TYPE THREE.

QUERY TYPE FOUR.

QUERY TYPE FIVE.

QUERY TYPE SIX.

BUILDING MORE COMPLEX QUERIES.

PRODUCTIVITY AND ERGONOMICS DESIGN.

COMPUTER ROOM COLOR AND LIGHTING.

VISUAL DISPLAY TERMINALS AND KEYBOARDS.

COMPUTER FURNITURE.

SUMMARY.

 Back to TOP

CHAPTER 19 DESIGNING ACCURATE DATA ENTRY PROCEDURES.

DATA ENTRY OBJECTIVES.

EFFECTIVE CODING.

KEEPING TRACK OF SOMETHING.

SIMPLE SEQUENCE CODES.

ALPHABETIC DERIVATION CODES.

CLASSIFYING INFORMATION.

CLASSIFICATION CODES.

BLOCK SEQUENCE CODES.

CONCEALING INFORMATION.

CIPHER CODES.

REVEALING INFORMATION.

SIGNIFICANT DIGIT SUBSET CODES.

MNEMONIC CODES.

REQUESTING APPROPRIATE ACTION.

FUNCTION CODES.

GENERAL GUIDELINES FOR CODING.

BE CONCISE.

KEEP THE CODES STABLE.

ASSURE THAT CODES ARE UNIQUE.

ALLOW CODES TO BE SORTABLE.

AVOID CONFUSING CODES.

KEEP THE CODES UNIFORM.

ALLOW FOR MODIFICATION.

MAKE THE CODE MEANIFUL.

EFFECTIVE AND EFFICIENT DATA CAPTURE.

DECIDING WHAT TO CAPTURE.

LETTING THE COMPUTER DO THE REST.

AVOIDING BOTTLE NECKS AND EXTRA STEPS.

STARTING WITH A GOOD FORM.

CHOOSING A DATA ENTRY METHOD.

KEY TO STORAGE.

OPTICAL CHARACTER RECOGNITION.

OTHER METHODS OF DATA ENTRY.

MAGNETIC INK CHARACTER RECOGNITION (MICR).

MARK SENSE FORMS.

PUNCH OUT FORMS.

BAR CODES.

USING INTELLIGENT TERMINALS.

ASSURING DATA QUALITY THROUGH INPUT VALIDATION.

VALIDATING INPUT TRANSACTIONS.

SUBMITTING THE WRONG DATA.

SUBMITTING OF DATA BY UNAUTHORIZED PEOPLE.

ASKING SYSTEM TO PERFORM AN UNACCEPTABLE FUNCTION.

VALIDATING INPUT DATA.

TEST FOR MISSING DATA.

TEST FOR CORRECT FIELD LENGTH.

TEST FOR CLASS OR COMPOSITION.

TEST FOR RANGE OR REASONABLENESS.

TEST FOR INVALID VALUES.

TEST FOR COMPARISON WITH STORED DATA.

SETTING UP SELF VALIDATING CODES.

USING CHECK DIGITS.

SUMMARY

 Back to TOP

CHAP 20

QUALITY ASSURANCE THOUGH SOFTWARE ENGINEERING

Approaches to quality.

The total quality management approach.

Responsibility for total quality management.

Structured walk-through.

Systems design and development.

Bottom up design.

Top down design.

Modular development.

Modularity in the windows environment.

Structured charts.

Drawing a structured chart.

Types of modules.

Module subordination.

SOFTWARE ENGINEERING AND DOCUMENTING.

Design and documentation techniques.

HIPO method.

THE VTOC.

Overview IPO diagrams.

Detailed IPO diagrams.

HIPO strengths and weaknesses.

Flowcharts.

Nassi-sheiderman charts.

Warnier-Orr diagrams.

Pseudocode.

Procedure Manuel.

Folklore method.

Choosing a design and documentation technique.

CODE GENERATION AND DESIGN REENGINEERING.

 TESTING, MAINTENANCE AND AUDITING.

Program testing with test data.

Link testing with test data.

Full system testing with test data.

Full system testing with live data.

Maintenance practices.

Auditing.

Summary.

 Back to TOP

CHAPTER 21 SUCCESSFULLY IMPLEMENTING THE INFORMATION SYSTEM.

IMPLEMENTATION APPROACHES.

ESTABLISHING AN INFORMATION CENTER.

A NEW ROLE FOR THE INFORMATION SYSTEMS DEPARTMENT.

INFORMATION CENTER OBJECTIVES.

THE SYSTEMS ANALYST IN THE INFORMATION CENTER.

ADVANTAGES OF THE INFORMATION CENTER TO USERS.

ADVANTAGES TO THE INFORMATION SYSTEMS DEPARTMENT.

DISADVANTAGES OF THE INFORMATION CENTER.

INFORMATION CENTER PRACTICES.

ADEQUATELY STAFFING THE INFORMATION CENTER.

PLANNING THE PHYSICAL SETUP OF THE INFORMATION CENTER.

PILOTING THE INFORMATION CENTER.

IMPLEMENTING DISTRIBUTED SYSTEMS.

TYPES OF DISTRIBUTED SYSTEMS NETWORKS.

HIERARCHICAL NETWORKS.

STAR NETWORKS.

RING NETWORKS.

BUS CONFIGURATIONS.

NETWORK MODELING.

DRAWING A NETWORK DECOMPOSITION DIAGRAM.

CREATING A HUB CONNECTIVITY DIAGRAM.

EXPLODING THE HUB CONNECTIVITY DIAGRAM INTO A WORK STATION CONNECTIVITY DIAGRAM.

GROUPWARE.

ADVANTAGES OF DISTRIBUTED SYSTEMS.

DISADVANTAGES OF DISTRIBUTED SYSTEMS.

TRAINING USERS.

TRAINING STRATEGIES.

WHO TO TRAIN.

PEOPLE WHO TRAIN USERS.

GUIDELINES FOR TRAINING.

TRAINING OBJECTIVES.

TRAINING METHODS.

TRAINING SITES.

TRAINING MATERIALS.

CONVERSION.

CONVERSION STRATEGIES.

DIRECT CHANGEOVER.

PARALLEL CONVERSION.

GRADUAL CONVERSION.

MODULAR PROTOTYPE CONVERSION.

DISTRIBUTED CONVERSION.

SECURITY.

PHYSICAL SECURITY.

LOGICAL SECURITY.

BEHAVIORAL SECURITY.

OTHER CONVERSION CONSIDERATIONS.

ORGANIZATIONAL METAPHORS AND THEIR RELATIONSHIP TO SUCCESSFUL SYSTEMS.

EVALUATION.

EVALUATION TECHNIQUES.

THE INFORMATION SYSTEM UTILITY APPROACH.

POSSESSION UTILITY.

FORM UTILITY.

PLACE UTILITY.

TIME UTILITY.

ACTUALIZATION UTILITY.

GOAL UTILITY.

EVALUATING THE SYSTEM.

SUMMARY.

Back to TOP

CHAPTER 22 OBJECT ORIENTED SYSTEMS ANALYSIS AND DESIGN.

THE OBJECT ORIENTED IDEA.

OBJECTS.

CLASSES.

MESSAGES.

ENCAPSULATION.

INHERITANCE.

POLYMORPHISM.

OBJECT ORIENTED ANALYSIS.

ANALYZING CLASSES AND OBJECTS.

KAYJAY WORLD EXAMPLE ONE.

ANALYZING STRUCTURES.

KAYJAY WORLD EXAMPLE TWO.

ANALYZING ATTRIBUTES.

INSTANCE CONNECTIONS.

PRELIMINARY SPECIFICATION TEMPLATE.

KAYJAY WORLD EXAMPLE THREE.

ANALYZING SERVICES.

OBJECT STATE ANALYSIS.

SERVICE SPECIFICATION.

MESSAGE SPECIFICATION.

ASSEMBLING THE SPECIFICATION TEMPLATE.

KAYJAY WORLD EXAMPLE FOUR.

ANALYZING SUBJECTS.

KAYJAY WORLD EXAMPLE 5.

OBJECT ORIENTED DESIGN.

DESIGNING THE PROBLEM DOMAIN COMPONENT.

REUSE DESIGN.

IMPLEMENTATION STRUCTURES.

LANGUAGE ACCOMMODATION.

KAYJAY WORLD EXAMPLE SIX.

DESIGNING THE HUMAN INTERFACE COMPONENT.

KAYJAY WORLD EXAMPLE SEVEN.

DESIGNING TASK AND DATA MANAGEMENT COMPONENTS.

KAYJAY WORLD EXAMPLE EIGHT.

ALTERNATIVE APPROACHES AND NOTATION.

SUMMARY.

 

 Back to TOP

 

TERMINOLOGY LANCE LAWSON

 CHAPTER 1

 COMPUTER GENERATED INFORMATION

 TRANSACTION PROCESSING SYSTEMS TPS

 MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS MIS

 OFFICE AUTOMATION SYSTEMS OAS

 KNOWLEDGE WORK SYSTEMS KWS

 DECISION SUPPORT SYSTEMS DSS

 ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE AI

 EXECUTIVE SUPPORT SYSTEMS ESS

 GROUP DECISION SUPPORT SYSTEMS GDSS

 GROUPWARE

 SYSTEM ANALYSIS AND DESIGN

 SYSTEM ANALYST

 SYSTEMS CONSULTANT

 SUPPORTING EXPERT

 AGENT OF CHANGE

 SYSTEM DEVELOPMENT LIFE CYCLE SDLC

 CASE TOOLS

 PROGRAM SPECIFICATIONS PACKET

 CASE REPOSITORY

 MAINTENANCE

 CODE GENERATION

 MIGRATE SYSTEMS

 SOFTWARE REVERSE ENGINEERING

 REENGINEERING

 COMPUTER ASSISTED REENGINEERING CARE

 LEGACY SOFTWARE

 OBJECT ORIENTED SYSTEMS ANALYSIS AND DESIGN.

 ETHICS

 MULTIVIEW

 PROTOTYPING

 SOFT SYSTEMS METHODOLOGY

 PROJECT CHAMPIONS

 CHAPTER 2

 SYSTEMS

 INTERRELATEDNESS

 INTERDEPENDENT

 ORGANIZATIONAL BOUNDRIES

 FEEDBACK

 ENVIRONMENT

 OPENNESS

 CLOSENESS

 ENTITY RELATIONSHIP

 OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT

 MIDDLE MANAGEMENT

 STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT

 ORGANIZATIONAL CULTURE

CHAPTER THREE

 OPERATIONAL FEASIBILITY

 TECHNICAL FEASIBILITY

 ECONOMIC FEASIBILITY

 GANTT CHART

 PERT DIAGRAMS

 CRITICAL PATH

 EXPEDITING

 COMPUTER BASED PROJECT SCHEDULING

 PERSONAL INFORMATION MANAGERS PIM

 TASK LEADER

 SOCIOEMOTIONAL LEADER

 TEAM NORMS

 TEAM PROCESS

 PRODUCTIVITY GOALS

 TEAM MOTIVATION

 CHAPTER 4

 SAMPLING

 SAMPLE POPULATION

 CONVENIENCE SAMPLE

 PURPOSIVE SAMPLE

 SIMPLE RANDOM SAMPLE

 COMPLEX RANDOM SAMPLE

 SYSTEMATIC SAMPLING

 STRATIFIED SAMPLING

 CLUSTER SAMPLING

 ATTRIBUTE DATA

 ACCEPTABLE INTERVAL ESTIMATE

 CONFIDENCE LEVEL

 VARIABLES

 DISPERSION

 HARD DATA

 QUANTITATIVE DATA

 QUALITATIVE DATA

 ARCHIVAL DOCUMENTS

 

BACK TO 100 examples in Business, Operations and Engineering.
Click Here

  Apply  Worldwide Now  

Email Lawson Computing

 

Back to TOP

 

Back to Lawson Computing Homepage

Do it once, do it right, and do it now.